Seitan

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DV
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#16 Postby DV » Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:25 am

Sometimes I use the technique from Millenium that forms the seitan in logs and wraps it in cheese cloth before simmering. This keeps it dense and allows you to make very pretty medallions. I've made seitan piccata and other dishes that call for sauteing and then saucing with this form/shape of seitan. Very elegant if you have company.

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markc7
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#17 Postby markc7 » Fri Feb 16, 2007 11:54 am

I'm making my first batch of homemade seitan as we speak. I'm using the recipe from Garden of Vegan. Hope it turns out well.

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#18 Postby Tarz » Sat Feb 17, 2007 6:46 am

I just buy the slices and use it in sandwiches - never cooked with it or ever attempted anything as drastic as actually making it myself. Recipe for disaster if ever there was.
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#19 Postby Kathryn » Sat Feb 17, 2007 5:26 pm

You don't have to add all those ingredients to wheat flour to make seitan. A very basic recipe is just wheat flour, simmered (never boiled, as it changes the texture to to 'puffy') in a broth.

For basic gluten (as per "The Farm Vegetarian Cookbook"):
Mix together 8 cups flour (1/2 unbleached with and 1/2 gluten flour--some recipes use all gluten flour because it's faster, but the end result isn't as good IMO) and 2-3 cups water to form a stiff dough. Knead 10-15 minutes until you have a smooth dough ball. (It should spring back when poked).

Put this in a large bowl, cover with water, and let sit for an hour.
Then, knead this under water, kneading out the starch and holding the gluten together. It may not hold together well at this stage, but keep on going and don't get discouraged. Change water when it gets milky. As you rinse out the starch (the 'milkiness' in the water), the mass will hold together better and better.

Let it rest, then repeat the kneading, letting it rest, changing water several times.

When the water stays almost clear, you'll have about 4 cups of gluten. It should be quite stretchy: there's a photo in the Farm Veg. cookbook of someone holding up one end of a piece of ready-to-cook gluten, and it's hanging like a big rubber band.

Simmer this in a broth of water or vegetable stock, soy sauce, onion, a bit of oil, about 1 hour. Again: simmer, do not boil. Keeping the temp low keeps the seitan dense and 'meaty.'

It's a bit time intensive, because you have to be around for the various kneedings, but makes a much better texture seitan than just mixing up gluten flour. The secret is in the kneading and rinsing.

I used this recipe to make seitan for a chili recipe to serve at a party, and one woman refused to believe it wasn't meat. She INSISTED that I MUST have used meat in the chili.

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michaelhobson
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#20 Postby michaelhobson » Sat Feb 17, 2007 5:45 pm

Kathryn wrote:You don't have to add all those ingredients to wheat flour to make seitan.


It helps though, if you want to have something that tates like more than boiled flour. :?

Kathryn wrote:Simmer this in a broth of water or vegetable stock, soy sauce, onion, a bit of oil'


Sounds like just as many ingredients anyway? :?

Regardless, the Farm cookbook is in fact the best cookbook. There really is no need for any other. :D

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#21 Postby Kathryn » Sun Feb 18, 2007 10:08 am

michaelhobson wrote:
It helps though, if you want to have something that tates like more than boiled flour. :?


It didn't taste like 'boiled flour' at all. I suppose if you just cooked it in water it would, but it absorbs the flavor from the broth and whatever else you put it in.

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#22 Postby Kathryn » Sun Feb 18, 2007 10:10 am

michaelhobson wrote:Sounds like just as many ingredients anyway? :?

Not really, since you have to make a broth to simmer the other recipe in anyway. And the broth ingredients don't need any measuring: pretty much just toss them in--though the onion should be chopped. No 'recipe' really needed.

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#23 Postby bbodygirl » Mon Jul 02, 2007 9:44 pm

SpeakLow wrote:OK, here is my first attempt at homemade seitan. It was surprisingly easy too, the hardest part was the simmering for an hour and the cooling. I was just in a hurry to try it. This is not my recipe, it comes from Isa at the PostPunkKitchen. I just wanted to add some pictures along with the recipe. I made a General Tso's Seitan tonight that was out of this world! I will post that recipe tomorrow night. In the meantime, I give you seitan...

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups vital wheat gluten flour
1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
1 cup very cold water or vegetable broth
1/2 cup soy sauce (I used Braggs)
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2 cloves garlic, pressed or grated on a microplane grater
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest


Simmering Broth
10 cups cold water or cold veggie broth
1/2 cup soy sauce
NOTE* I found that this broth made the seitan just too salty if you plan on marinating the seitan for another recipe later on. If you do plan on marinating for another recipe, use plain water and soy sauce, ditch the broth.
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Directions

In a large bowl, mix together Vital Wheat Gluten Flour and nutritional yeast flakes. In a seperate bowl, mix together reamining ingredients: water or veg broth, soy sauce. tomato paste, garlic, lemon zest.
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Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and combine with a firm spatula, knead dough for about 3 minutes until a spongy, elastic dough is formed. I kneaded mine in the mixer, worked great. Let the dough rest for a couple of minutes and prepare your simmering broth, but don't start boiling it.
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Now roll your dough into a log shape about 8 inches long and cut into 3 equal sized pieces. I just grabbed the ball of dough and tore pieces off, it gave the seitan a nice bite size shape, similar to mock meat I guess. The dough should not be sticky, it should fall right off of your fingers, but it should also not fall apart, it should hold shape. If it does not, adjust flour/water. Place the pieces in the broth. It is important that the water/broth be very cold when you add the dough, it helps with the texture and ensures that it doesn't fall apart. Partially cover the pot (leave a little space for steam to escape) and bring to a boil.
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When the water has come to a boil set the heat to low and gently simmer for an hour, turning the pieces every now and again.
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Now you've got gluten. Let it cool in the simmering broth for at least a half an hour. It is best if it cools completely. While it's cooling, you may feel the texture is soft like raw dough. DON'T worry like I did, as it cools it firms up into a nice texture. You must cool it for it to firm up though!

What you do next depends on the recipe you are using. If it calls for gluten use it as is. If you want to store some of it for later use put it in a sealable container covered in the simmering broth.
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Hello,

I will have liked to make this receipt, but here in France in the place of the "cups", we have grams. Who could say to me ? Thank you.

:hello2:

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offense74
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#24 Postby offense74 » Tue Jul 03, 2007 3:25 am

1 cup = 2.366 dl :wink:
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bbodygirl
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#25 Postby bbodygirl » Wed Jul 04, 2007 6:45 pm

offense74 wrote:1 cup = 2.366 dl :wink:


Thanks :D

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the Asocial Ape
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#26 Postby the Asocial Ape » Mon Aug 06, 2007 10:36 am

DV wrote:S...wraps it in cheese cloth before simmering. This keeps it dense...


brilliant! i make seitan from scratch nearly every weekend, and i'm ALWAYS working for perfect dense hunks.

i'm always tweaking recipe stuff - adding some garbanzo flour, more water, less water, changing the kneading and resting time, or altering the pressure i cook it at.

i never even thought about doing something mechanical to control it. thanks for posting that.


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