Muscular Protein Bond -- Strongest Yet Found In Nature

Anything else on your mind that you would like to discuss with other like-minded people.

Moderators: Mini Forklift Ⓥ, C.O., Richard, robert, SyrLinus

Message
Author
User avatar
Vegan Joe
Stegosaurus
Posts: 3735
Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2007 8:12 pm
Location: Enroute to 58

Muscular Protein Bond -- Strongest Yet Found In Nature

#1 Postby Vegan Joe » Fri Aug 14, 2009 10:44 am

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 190611.htm

A research collaboration between Munich-based biophysicists and a structural biologist in Hamburg is helping to explain why our muscles, and those of other animals, don't simply fall apart under stress. Their findings may have implications for fields as diverse as medical research and nanotechnology.

The real strength of any skeletal muscle doesn't start with exercise; it comes ultimately from nanoscale biological building blocks. One key element is a bond involving titin, a giant among proteins. Titin is considered a molecular "ruler" along which the whole muscle structure is aligned, and it acts as an elastic spring when a muscle is stretched.

Titin plays a role in a wide variety of muscle functions, and these in turn hinge on the stability with which it is anchored in a structure called the sarcomeric Z-disk. Research published in 2006 showed this anchor to be a rare palindromic arrangement of proteins – that is, it "reads" the same way forward and backward – in which two titin molecules are connected by another muscle protein, telethonin. Simulations have pointed toward a network of tight hydrogen bonds linking titin and telethonin as a source of stability. But direct measurements that would further advance this investigation have been lacking, until today's publication of

Happiness is a personal choice!
I am the sole source of all my sadness and joy.


"The logic of worldly success rests on a
fallacy: the strange error that our perfection
depends on the thoughts and
opinions and applause of other men."
Source: Thomas Merton

Return to “General Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 15 guests