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 Post subject: Entire Workout Chapter from Shred It! (minus photos)
PostPosted: Sun Jul 26, 2015 4:05 pm 
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Hi everyone,

Here is an entire chapter from Shred It!, minus photos:


Chapter 9 – Exercises to get Big and Ripped


“I've never really viewed myself as particularly talented. Where I excel is (through) ridiculous, sickening work ethic. While the other guy's sleeping, I'm working. While the other guy's eating, I'm working.”

— Will Smith

A lot of people do the same exercises over and over with the same weight and number of repetitions and expect a different result. Eight-time Mr. Olympia Champion, Ronnie Coleman, has a wake-up call for you. “If you always do what you’ve always done, you always get what you always got.” He probably wasn’t the first to say that, but he was the first I heard say that, and like many things Ronnie says, it stuck with me. Though consistency can lead to adaptation and improvement, there are usually components such as a change in intensity, change in exercises, repetition range, and other factors that influence the end result. It is a good idea to do the same exercises for a few weeks to track progression to see if you’re getting stronger in the same exercises performed weeks prior, but after four weeks or so of doing the same routine, it is wise to change it up. Simply going to the gym and riding the bike at the same resistance level for the same duration day after day won’t do much except make you adapt to that very resistance level and duration to make it become a little bit easier over time. To really improve is to change things up in a more dramatic way. You could pedal faster, pedal harder, change the duration, change the style using circuits, incorporate other exercises into your morning stationary bike commute, and a whole host of other actions to change the way your body will adapt to the added stress.

The primary alterations you will want to make when adjusting your workout routine are:

1. Change the type of exercise
2. Change the level of intensity
3. Change the duration

These three simple factors can be combined in a number of ways. For example, if you go for a three-mile run every morning, and are not seeing the improved speed or endurance results you’re looking for, here are some ways you can adjust your approach:

1. Combine running with rowing, cycling, swimming, box jumps, sprints, or some other type of exercise that will train your muscles and your heart and lungs differently.

2. Incorporate sprints into your workout. Run for a mile, sprint for a 100 meters, and repeat. Or run three miles, followed by five to ten 100-meter sprints after your primary workout.

3. Run four miles, and build up to five miles, six, and beyond.

Additionally, you can alter the number of workouts per week, change your training style, including minor changes such as new shoes in the example above, and new gloves, wider grips, drop sets, super sets, rest pauses, and other alterations, when referring to weight training. You can change the time of day for which you exercise, alter the foods you eat pre- and post-workout, train with a partner, group or team, rather than on your own, or vice versa, and many more variations what will all have some sort of impact on your end result.

Rather than sticking with the same old routine that has left you where you are now, I suggest you mix it up by turning things up a notch to get where you want to be. The following are some examples for you to examine and incorporate into your own exercise routine, if they are of interest to you. Remember, if it isn’t fun, you probably won’t do it, so pick the exercises that seem most enjoyable and perform them with enthusiasm and effort with a specific end result in mind.

Fat-burning cardiovascular exercises

These exercises should be performed on an empty stomach first thing in the morning to get shredded.

• Walking
• Jogging
• Running
• Sprinting
• Hiking
• Swimming
• Cycling
• Rowing
• Stair climbing
• Jumping
• Total body exercises (like Burpees)
• CrossFit
• High Intensity Interval Training
• Circuit training
• Handball or racquet sports
• Any team or individual sport involving running, rowing, swimming or cycling

Strength-building exercises to put on muscle

• Squats
• Deadlifts
• Bench Press
• Overhead Press
• Lunges
• Pull-ups
• Dips
• Shrugs
• Rack pulls
• Push-ups
• T-bar rows
• Bicep curls
• Skull crushers
• Olympic lifts
• Other free weight, compound exercises

Alterations to the standard lifts

Combined with the exercises listed above, you can incorporate the following:

• Low reps
• High reps
• Slow reps
• Partial reps
• Assisted reps
• 1-rep max
• Super sets
• Drop sets
• Negatives (eccentric contractions)
• Narrow grip
• Wide grip
• Neutral grip
• Reverse grip
• Rest pause
• Twenty-ones
• Pyramids

By changing the style that you perform these exercises, you change the impact it has on your body, and you can break through from your regular routine to advance with new gains. When you do this over time, you are bound to see results.

Additionally, you can change the level of intensity performed in each exercise, from fasted cardiovascular training first thing in the morning, to explosive compound, free-weight exercises. Some of those changes might look like this:

• High Intensity Training (HIT)
• High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)
• 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off
• Increasing level of intensity in a pyramid, working your way up and back down, cycling your level of energy expenditure, changing by the minute

The following is a week’s worth of sample exercises, followed by numerous options for additional workouts for set muscle groups. The exercises listed below emphasize training one or two muscle groups per day, in a muscle-building routine designed to exhaust specific muscle groups and allow them long rest periods to recover and grow. You can do total body workouts all you want, and some of those programs will be listed in this chapter as well, and your body may respond well to them. I like total body workouts, but my bodybuilding experience tells me that the following approach of targeting specific muscle groups for an entire workout is an effective one for building quality muscle. I like P90X and CrossFit as much as the next person, and my experience with those genres of training, tells me that they will surely make you very fit. To really build significant muscle and strength though, a more targeted and deliberate approach to training for muscle size is usually required. Not that total body training such as the programs mentioned above won’t build muscle, I just don’t believe they are as effective as focusing on one or two muscle groups a day using the best compound, free-weight exercises to elicit the greatest return on investment. Total body exercises are excellent for burning fat, getting toned, building up endurance and core strength and getting ripped. I just don’t believe that helps you build as much muscle as a tailor-made approach to building muscle such as the ones I will outline in the workouts below.

When we take the time to dedicate an entire workout to training one or two muscle groups, we exercise those muscles much more thoroughly and completely than we would in a more casual total body workout. Follow the guidelines listed below to put on some serious muscle. If you stick with a specific routine for four weeks, you should see results in strength and muscle gains in week four compared to week one. Then you can mix up your routine for another four weeks, and so on every three to six weeks, or whatever schedule is comfortable for you based on your own progression. Once you have experienced this type of muscle building training, by all means, try total body workouts for weeks at a time and see how they compare to specific muscle-building training. Each of us responds differently to different workloads and stresses on the body, so always feel free to experiment with a variety of programs and follow the ones that resonate the most with you. Let’s get shredded!

Sample Muscle-Building Workout Routines

An effective muscle-building schedule:

Week 1

• Monday = Chest/Shoulders
• Tuesday = Back
• Wednesday = Legs
• Thursday = Rest
• Friday = Arms
• Saturday = Abs
• Sunday = Rest

Week 2

• Monday = Chest
• Tuesday = Back/Shoulders
• Wednesday = Legs
• Thursday = Rest
• Friday = Arms
• Saturday = Abs, forearms, calves
• Sunday = Rest

Week 3

• Monday = Chest
• Tuesday = Back
• Wednesday = Legs
• Thursday = Rest
• Friday = Arms/Shoulders
• Saturday = Abs
• Sunday = Rest

Week 4

• Monday = Chest
• Tuesday = Back
• Wednesday = Legs
• Thursday = Rest
• Friday = Arms, forearms, calves
• Saturday = Abs/Shoulders
• Sunday = Rest

Primary multi-joint, compound, free weight and bodyweight muscle building exercises to choose from include:
Chest

• Flat bench press
• Incline bench press
• Decline bench press
• Flat dumbbell press
• Incline dumbbell press
• Decline dumbbell press
• Flat dumbbell flys
• Incline dumbbell flys
• Decline dumbbell flys
• Dips
• Push-ups
• Decline push-ups
• Various cables and machines as desired

Shoulders

• Barbell overhead press
• Dumbbell overhead press
• Dumbbell lateral raises
• Dumbbell front raises
• Dumbbell rear deltoid raises
• Upright rows
• Barbell shrugs
• Dumbbell shrugs
• One-arm dumbbell overhead raises
• Military press
• Various cables and machines as desired

Back

• Deadlifts
• Wide grip pull-ups
• Narrow grip pull-ups
• Neutral grip pull-ups
• T-Bar rows
• Bent-over rows
• One-arm dumbbell rows
• Rack pulls
• Lat pull-downs
• High rows
• Mid rows
• Low rows
• Various cables and machines as desired

Legs

• Squats
• One-legged squats
• Jump squats
• Lunges
• Jump lunges
• Leg press
• Hack squats
• Deadlifts
• Calf raises
• Box jumps
• Wall-sits
• Various cables and machines as desired

Arms

Biceps

• Alternating bicep curls
• Hammer curls
• Concentration curls
• Preacher curls
• Negatives (eccentric contractions)
• Reverse grip pull-ups
• Reverse grip lat pull-downs
• Various cables and machines as desired

Triceps

• Skull crushers
• Narrow grip bench press
• Overhead extensions
• One-arm overhead extensions
• Dumbbell kickbacks
• Negatives (eccentric contractions)
• Dips
• Push-ups
• Decline push-ups
• Various cables and machines as desired

Abs

• Hanging leg raises
• Hanging knee raises
• Windshield wipers
• Plank
• Weighted plank
• Lying leg raises
• Bicycle crunches
• Crunches
• Side crunches
• Weighted crunches
• Ab wheel roll-outs
• Sit ups
• Various cables and machines as desired

The Workouts

In the sample workouts listed below, I included a morning fasted cardio session in addition to a weight training session for the same day. The fasted cardio first thing in the morning is intended to help you efficiently burn fat, supporting your overall fitness goals. The weight training workouts are to help you build muscle, supporting your other fitness goals. If bulking up is your primary objective, you may consider omitting the morning cardio, or limiting it to once or twice a week, to avoid burning too many calories and getting too lean. The examples are exactly that, just samples and loose guidelines. You can follow them exactly and you’ll get really fit and really strong, but you can also alter them based on your own interests, the equipment you have access to, and based on your own work ethic, desires, and objectives. You will notice that I prefer the 8-12 repetition range for most exercises, but that I also incorporate a good balance of high reps (around 20 or so) and low reps (6 or so) in most of the workouts. This is to train muscle fibers differently, and to engage in different lengths of time for individual sets. The varying repetitions may also bring about strength gains and produce muscle tone in ways that benefit your physique and your interests. Some people may respond better to high repetitions such as 25-50 reps per set, and some may respond better to really heavy weights with lower reps such as 3-5 reps per set. I try to incorporate a pretty good balance in the workouts provided.

In general, I like to warm up with 20-30 reps, and perform the 8-12 repetition range for my working sets. With my favorite exercises I like to lift especially heavy and just complete a few reps with as heavy weight as I can. Sometimes I like the burning sensation that comes from high repetition training for specific muscles such as biceps, triceps, quads, and calves. Yet other times I prefer to focus exclusively on Olympic lifts completing just 5-10 reps per set to thoroughly thrash my body. At the end of the day, I respect the diversity and benefits of high and low repetition training and incorporate both into my regular training routine. You can too, and take notice of how your body responds to varying stress levels through changes in repetition ranges. Experiment with high, mid, and low rep ranges for a few weeks and notice if one particular approach yields the best results or is the most fun. If it fits your interests, you can incorporate all three repetition ranges in a given workout and determine your own preferred range for your primary working sets.

Above all else, train intelligently with purpose and passion with specific goals in mind. Make it fun, keep it safe, and be open to learning, unafraid of asking questions from those who have been there, done that. Use your resources from local trainers to online discussion groups, to popular websites and books to help you construct the physique and health outcome you desire.

Sample Workout #1 – Chest and Shoulders

A sample workout for someone who wants to get big and ripped might look like this:

Morning

Workout on an empty stomach (fasted cardio)
15-minute jog at a low level of intensity
15-minute cycle, varying levels of intensity to increase heart rate
15-minute row, rowing hard and fast every fifth minute for one minute

Afternoon/early evening

Weight-training workout (chest and shoulders)

10 minutes of cardiovascular training to warm-up, such as using the stair stepper

Chest

• Push-ups x 3 sets of 20 (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Incline bench press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dumbbell flys x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dips or weighted dips x 3 sets of 6-8 reps with decline push-ups as super sets doing as many reps as possible for each set

Shoulders

• Lateral raises x 3 sets of 8-12 reps with super sets of front raises x 8-12 reps
• Overhead shoulder press x 3 sets of 8-10 reps
• Dumbbell shrugs x 6 (total) sets of 8-20 reps with a drop set after each initial set

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

This sample workout for chest and shoulders covers 30 total sets, which is pretty high volume, but remember that three sets are for warm-ups and nine sets are either drop sets or super sets, which don’t take up very much time. This entire workout can still be completed in an hour and is designed to use exclusively free weights and bodyweight exercises aiming for an approximate 8-12 rep range as an average for the entire workout (drop sets and super sets could be very low reps as the body is fatigued and is pushing hard immediately after completing the initial set).

Sample Workout #2 - Back

Morning

Workout on an empty stomach (fasted cardio)

30-minute swim (or alternative preferred cardiovascular exercise for half an hour)
Afternoon/early evening

10 minutes of cardiovascular exercise to warm-up, such as using the stair-stepper

Weight-training workout (Back)

• Lat pull-downs x 3 sets of 15-20 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Cable rows x 3 sets of 12-15 reps (used as an additional warm-up before free weights)
• Deadlifts x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• T-Bar rows x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Pull-ups x 3 sets of 8-12 reps or to failure
• Bent-over rows x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Our backs are quite vulnerable and susceptible to injury so I choose to include a couple of warm-up sets with high repetitions before I go into a heavy lift such as deadlifts, T-bar rows, bent-over rows, or some other intense exercise. I highly suggest a significant warm-up plus stretching before engaging in deadlifts.

Sample Workout #3 - Legs

Morning

Workout on an empty stomach (fasted cardio)
30-minute Hike
Circuit including 15 box jumps, 40 crunches, 30-second wall-sit – Repeat three times

Afternoon/early evening

10 minutes of cardiovascular exercise to warm-up, such as using the stair stepper

Weight training workout (Legs)

• Bodyweight squats x 3 sets of 30 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Barbell Squats x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Lunges carrying dumbbells x 8-12 reps, incorporating drop sets after each set, lowering the weight until using no weight at all
• Leg Press x 3 sets of 6-10 reps, super setting with jump lunges
• Calf raises x 3 sets of as many reps as possible until the burning sensation overcomes you (anyone who trains calves regularly knows this feeling very well)

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

In this sample workout, we elected to focus on legs for the entire training session. There are plenty of training styles, including focusing on total body, upper lower body, core, or one or two muscle groups per workout. Since a real tough leg workout is one of the most challenging ways to train, and one of the most effective at building muscle and strength, I chose to isolate the legs for this workout.

We managed a nice hike in the morning to burn fat by exercising on an empty stomach, and also incorporated some box jumps, wall sits, and core work, knowing we would be calling upon leg and core strength for the weight training workout in the late afternoon. During the actual leg training workout to build muscle, we busted out approximately 21 sets (the number varies based on the actual number of drop sets completed), which included three initial sets of bodyweight squats to get the lower body warmed up and prepared to squat. The volume was a bit lower here and could easily be altered by adding another exercise such as leg extensions or by changing the three sets per exercise to four sets for some of them. I prefer four sets for most exercises and even five or more sets for certain exercises such as leg press. Using a three-set example allows for more different types of exercises to fit into the workout for this specific illustration. In my personal training, I might complete just three exercises total during a given workout, such as squats, leg presses, and lunges. I often like to pick the exercises that will give me the greatest return on investment and focus more time on those (such as squats) versus an isolated movement like machine hamstring curls. Clearly the compound, multi-joint, free-weight squats will help build more muscle than using a curl machine.

Sample Workout #4 - Arms

Morning
Workout on an empty stomach (fasted cardio)
30-minute jog

Afternoon/early evening

10 minutes of cardiovascular exercise to warm-up, such as using the stair stepper

Weight Training Workout (Arms)

Push-ups x 3 sets of 15-25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
Cable curls x 3 sets of 15-20 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)

Biceps

• Alternating dumbbell bicep curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dumbbell hammer curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• EZ curl narrow-grip bicep curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps + negatives if desired

Triceps

• Skull crushers x 3 sets of 8-12 reps, superset with narrow-grip bench press
• Overhead extensions x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dips x 3 sets of 8-12 reps, superset with decline push-ups if desired

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Training arms is a great way to get in and get out of the gym quickly, if time is something you are concerned with. Biceps and triceps are relatively small muscles; therefore, they recover quickly between sets. When training back or chest you may need to rest a couple of minutes between sets, but with your arms, you’ll find sufficient recovery after just about a minute of rest, ready to go again for the next set. You can base this on actual time, using a clock or stopwatch, or determine this based on feel. I prefer the latter. I stretch or massage my arms between sets, or simply get a drink of water, record my set in my training journal, do arm circles, or even sit on a bench for a moment before going back to hammer out another set.

You might discover that training arms will require less overall time. You may spend up to 90 minutes training legs, due to long recovery periods for large muscle groups and the sheer number of reps and sets you may need to perform to include quads, hamstrings, glutes, and calves in one workout. A chest/shoulders or back workout might take 60-75 minutes to perform, whereas an arm workout could easily be completed in less than an hour. You’ll still get a sufficient pump, breakdown lots of muscle tissue, and feel content with a hardcore lifting session that was only 48 minutes long. No shame in that. Carry on, my friend.

Sample Workout #5 - Abs

Morning
Workout on an empty stomach (fasted cardio)
30 minutes on the spin bike

Afternoon/early evening

10 minutes of cardiovascular exercise to warm-up, such as using the stair stepper

Weight Training Workout (Abs)

• Front crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Left side crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Right side crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Hanging leg raises x 3 sets of as many reps as possible – Superset with hanging knee raises until failure
• Plank x 3 sets for 90 seconds or until failure
• Lying leg raises x 3 sets of 20 reps
• Bicycle crunches x 3 sets of 100 reps (50 each side)

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

If you train your abdominals appropriately, you will feel a similar level of exhaustion you will experience during or immediately following a back or chest workout. I bet you haven’t experienced that sensation training abs all that often. A lot of us tend to focus on a few sets of sit-ups or crunches, a plank or two, and call it good. Abdominal training is often tacked on to the end of some other workout. For some of the same reasons we often avoid doing lunges, we avoid doing extensive abdominal training—it hurts and it isn’t always loads of fun.

When was the last time you truly looked forward to doing 3-5 sets of planks for as long as possible until falling face-first on the ground, or doing hanging leg raises until your forearms, not your abs, told you it was time to call it a day? My guess is never. Rarely do we get super pumped about exercises that lead to a strong burning sensation that challenges us mentally, physically, and aerobically. Rather than just tacking abdominal training on to the end of your workout, give abdominals their own workout, or split the time evenly with some other muscle group, like you do with chest and shoulders, biceps and triceps, and quads and hamstrings.

Summary

The workouts listed above will carve out a lean and strong physique for you if you follow the routine for four to six weeks. After that length of time performing the same exercises week after week, adapting and getting stronger, it would be a good idea to change it up, incorporating new exercises, adjusting the repetition range, and forcing your body to adapt to new stresses placed up on it. As you get more comfortable with all of these free weight exercises, you might want to change up a routine every three or four weeks, allowing just enough time to achieve noticeable strength gains in the same exercises week after week before creating a new baseline with different exercises. If you maintain the same exact routine for too long, say a couple of months with no change, you will likely hit a few plateaus, lose interest, notice longer periods between measurable improvements, and it will likely compel you to seek out a new approach. Likewise, if you’re really adventurous you could change your workout routine every week, or even every day. Do what works for you, do what you enjoy, and work hard to reach your goals.

Review the lists of exercises, training styles, and workout routines listed above, and evaluate the approaches to fat-loss and muscle building (from the previous chapters) and determine what best fits into your schedule, based on your specific goals.

Consider the following additional samples for ways you can alter your weight training workouts, using a combination of free weights, machines, and cables to achieve the gains you are looking to experience. I selected the repetition range of 8-12 because it is the most commonly performed by weight lifters. It doesn’t mean you need to stick within this range. There are various benefits from training with lower repetitions (some train with a 1-rep max approach for strength), as well as training with higher repetitions. As mentioned earlier, my exercise sets routinely range between three and thirty repetitions, sometimes during the same workout. Some exercises are such powerful movements I naturally want to do a lower amount of reps with heavy weights. Exercises such as T-bar rows, bench press, leg press, and power cleans come to mind. Squats and deadlifts might fit into this category for many as well. Other exercises, I naturally want to do a lot of reps for, including calf raises, biceps and triceps exercises, leg extensions, and most abdominal movements. Your personal rep range many vary based on your goals, your preferences, the equipment you have available, and numerous other factors from your range of motion/flexibility to nagging injuries or other limitations, to your level of aerobic conditioning.

Determine your own personal desired repetition range and incorporate many of the following exercises into your routine. I list the 15-20 repetition range for most warm-up exercises and the 8-12 repetition range for most working sets in the examples below because that is what I follow, and it is a common approach among many lifters. If you are a beginner or do not have a specific range you work within, 8-12 repetitions is a standard range that most people would benefit from. These daily workouts are just samples. You can follow them directly or incorporate whichever aspects you like from each one into your current training program. As usual, if you have your own personal trainer, lifting coach, or other fitness instructor, consult with them and see how these programs fit in with their objectives for you, based on your specific fitness goals. Train hard, use good form, be safe, and have fun!

Additional Sample Muscle-Building Workouts

Sample Chest Workout #1

Warm-up (10 minutes)

Stair stepper, stationary bike, treadmill, jogging, or some other type of cardiovascular exercise to get blood flowing and joints and muscles warmed up.

• Push-ups x 3 sets of 20 reps (used as an additional warm-up before free weights)
• Incline barbell bench press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Flat dumbbell press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Decline barbell bench press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dumbbell flys x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dips x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Total = 18 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.
Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Chest Workout #2

Warm-up (10 minutes)

Stair stepper, stationary bike, treadmill, jogging, or some other type of cardiovascular exercise to get blood flowing and joints and muscles warmed up.

• Push-ups x 3 sets of 20 reps (used as an additional warm-up before free weights)
• Incline dumbbell press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Flat dumbbell press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Decline barbell bench press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Incline dumbbell flys x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• High pulley cable cross-overs x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Low pulley cable cross-overs x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Total = 21 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Shoulder Workout #1

Warm-up (10 minutes)

Stair stepper, stationary bike, treadmill, jogging or some other type of cardiovascular exercise to get blood flowing and joints and muscles warmed up.

• Push-ups x 3 sets of 20 reps (used as an additional warm-up before free weights)
• Lateral dumbbell raises x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Front dumbbell raises x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Upright rows x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Overhead barbell press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Behind the back barbell shrugs x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Total = 18 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.
Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes nuts and seeds.

Sample Shoulder Workout #2

Warm-up (10 minutes)

Stair stepper, stationary bike, treadmill, jogging or some other type of cardiovascular exercise to get blood flowing and joints and muscles warmed up.

• Push-ups x 3 sets of 20 reps (used as an additional warm-up before free weights)
• Low pulley cable cross-over lateral/rear deltoid raises x 3 sets of 8-12 sets
• Overhead dumbbell press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• One-arm dumbbell presses from floor x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dumbbell shrugs x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Angled incline seated shoulder front deltoid raises x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Total = 18 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Back Workout #1

Warm-up (10 minutes)

Stair stepper, stationary bike, treadmill, jogging, or some other type of cardiovascular exercise to get blood flowing and joints and muscles warmed up.

• Lat pull-downs x 3 sets of 15-20 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Machine rows x 3 sets of 12-15 reps (used as an additional warm-up before free weights)
• Pull-ups x 3 sets of 8-12 reps or to failure
• Rack pulls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• T-bar rows x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• One-arm dumbbell rows x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Total = 18 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Back Workout #2

Warm-up (10 minutes)

Stair stepper, stationary bike, treadmill, jogging, or some other type of cardiovascular exercise to get blood flowing and joints and muscles warmed up.

• Cable rows x 3 sets of 15-20 reps (used as an additional warm-up before free weights)
• Cable pull-downs x 3 sets of 12-15 reps (used as an additional warm-up before free weights)
• Rack pulls x 4 sets of 8-12 reps
• Deadlifts x 4 sets of 8-12 reps
• T-bar rows x 4 sets of 8-12 reps
• Pull-ups x 4 sets of 8-12 reps

Total = 22 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Leg Workout #1

Warm-up (10 minutes)

Stair stepper, stationary bike, treadmill, jogging, or some other type of cardiovascular exercise to get blood flowing and joints and muscles warmed up.

• Bodyweight squats x 3 sets of 30 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Front squats x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Hack squats x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Leg press x 3 sets of 6-10 reps, super setting with jump lunges
• Toe presses on leg press machine x 3 sets of as many reps as possible until the burning sensation overcomes you (anyone who trains calves regularly knows this feeling very well).

Total = 18 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Leg Workout #2

Warm-up (10 minutes)

Stair stepper, stationary bike, treadmill, jogging, or some other type of cardiovascular exercise to get blood flowing and joints and muscles warmed up.

• Bodyweight squats x 3 sets of 30 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Barbell squats x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Leg extensions x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Lying hamstring curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Deadlifts x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Standing calf raises x 3 sets of as many reps as possible until the burning sensation overcomes you (anyone who trains calves regularly knows this feeling very well).
• Seated toe presses x 3 sets of as many reps as possible until the burning sensation overcomes you (anyone who trains calves regularly knows this feeling very well).

Total = 21 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Arm Workout #1

Push-ups x 3 sets of 15-25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
Cable curls x 3 sets of 15-20 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)

Biceps

• Alternating dumbbell bicep curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dumbbell hammer curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• EZ curl narrow-grip bicep curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Triceps

• Skull crushers x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Overhead extensions x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dips x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Total = 24 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.
Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Arm Workout #2

Push-ups x 3 sets of 15-25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
Machine curls x 3 sets of 15-20 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)

Biceps
• One arm dumbbell concentration curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• EZ curl preacher curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Two arm straight bar bicep curls x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Triceps

• Narrow-grip bench press x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Decline push-ups with neutral grip x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Dumbbell kickbacks x 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Total = 24 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Abdominal Workout #1

• Front crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Left side crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Right side crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Cable crunches x 3 sets of 15-20 reps
• Weighted decline sit-ups x 3 sets of 8-12 reps
• Hanging knee raises to the front, left and right sides, x 3 sets of 10-15 reps
• Lying leg raises x 3 sets of 15-20 reps

Total = 21 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Sample Abdominal Workout #2

• Front crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Left side crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Right side crunches x 3 sets of 25 reps (used as a warm-up for muscles used in workout)
• Hanging leg raises x 3 sets of as many reps as possible
• Weighted abdominal crunch machine x 3 sets of 15-20 reps
• Medicine ball partner sit-ups x 3 sets x as many reps as possible
• Cable sledge hammer/axe swings x 3 sets of 15-20 reps per side
• Plank x 3 sets until failure

Total = 24 sets

Finish with 15 minutes on the stair stepper, stationary bike, or if the weather is pleasant, a nice jog out in the sun.

Follow workout with an emphasis on recovery foods, high in quality muscle-building nutrition, such as fruits, starches, greens, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds.

Summary

If you have questions about how to complete any of the exercises listed, please use the wonderful resources found on the Internet to search for photos, videos, descriptions, and demonstrations. I’m not going to leave you hanging, on your own to seek this information out. I have recruited my favorite vegan fitness model, Mindy Collette, to join me in demonstrating some key exercises that make up the core of the various exercise programs outlined in this chapter. I hope these photo demonstrations help you perform the exercises with a greater level of confidence and understanding.

We opted to demonstrate the exercises that are perhaps the least common of the exercises listed, making the assumption that many of you are familiar with the basics such as a standard bench press, push-up, and squat. Though many are familiar with a standard push-up, an exercise like a skull crusher or T-bar row may be more foreign.

These photos are listed roughly in the order of how they are listed in this chapter: *Photos removed. It would be too time-consuming to incorporate dozens of photos into this forum post/free sample chapter, but many book photos have been shared online in the past.*

Total Body Workouts

Not everyone has access to a gym to use the types of equipment that is outlined above, or have that kind of equipment at home. If you do not have access to a gym, or you prefer not to go to one, and don’t have weight training equipment at home, bodyweight exercises and total body workouts just might be your best approach.

If you don’t have access to the equipment to do the exercises that Mindy and I demonstrate in the photos above, you can get a tremendous workout by using just your body, to do common exercises such as push-ups, squats, lunges, jumps, sprints, and so many more. You can pick any one of those exercises and train to exhaustion in a pretty short amount of time, mere seconds or minutes, depending on the exercise. You can alter your pace, depth, repetition range, and level of intensity to change the dynamic and impact of each exercise. I lead group fitness classes at various health conferences without any equipment at all, just using our own bodies, and nearly everyone, regardless of their level of fitness, is exhausted by the end. That is because no matter what the exercise is, you can always perform repetitions to failure and you can use drop sets and super sets to lead to exhaustion with movements as simple as bodyweight push-ups, squats, lunges, static holds, and jumps.

If total body exercises are more in line with your interest, consider some of the following total body workouts to incorporate into your exercise schedule.

Total Body Workout Sample #1 – Upper Body Exercises

Warm-up (10-15 minutes)

Perform the following in a continuous motion for at least 10 minutes with 30 second intervals performing each exercise, followed by 30 seconds of jogging in place between each exercise:

• Arm circles for 1 minute forward and 1 minute backward
• Jog in place for 1 minute and swing your arms in and out and side to side to loosen up
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• High knees for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Heels to glutes for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Jumping Jacks/Jills for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• High skips for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Squats for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Push-ups for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Invisible jump rope for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Star jumps for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 1 minute and swing your arms in and out and side to side

Stretching (5-10 minutes)

Stretch your quads, hamstrings, calves, abdominals, arms, chest, shoulders, and back through a variety of basic stretches to loosen up after the warm-up. Stretching is not to be overlooked and should be performed once some form of preliminary exercise has been completed to increase circulation, improve flexibility, and warm-up joints and muscles that will be used in the forthcoming exercises.

Upper body exercises (20-30 minutes or as long as you want)

Push-ups x as many reps as you can for 3-5 sets
Plank x as long as you can hold it for 3-5 sets
Push-up jacks x as many as you can for 3-5 sets
Slow moving Spiderman push-ups x as many as you can do for 3-5 sets

Cool Down/Stretching (5-10 minutes)

Arm circles for 1 minute forward and 1 minute backward
Jog in place for 2 minutes
Stretch your quads, hamstrings, calves, abdominals, arms, chest, shoulders, and back through a variety of basic stretches to stretch muscles out after the workout.

Total Body Workout Sample #2 – Lower Body Exercises

Warm-up (10-15 minutes)

Perform the following in a continuous motion for at least 10 minutes with 30 second intervals performing each exercise, followed by 30 seconds of jogging in place between each exercise:

• Ankle circles for 30 seconds forward, 30 seconds backward with each foot
• Arm circles for 1 minute forward and 1 minute backward
• Jog in place for 1 minute and swing your arms in and out and side to side to loosen up
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• High knees for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Heels to glutes for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Jumping Jacks/Jills for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• High skips for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Squats for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Lunges for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Invisible jump rope for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Star jumps for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Speed skaters for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 1 minute and swing your arms in and out and side to side

Stretching (5-10 minutes)

Stretch your quads, hamstrings, calves, abdominals, arms, chest, shoulders, and back through a variety of basic stretches to loosen up after the warm-up. Stretching is not to be overlooked and should be performed once some form of preliminary exercise has been performed to increase circulation, improve flexibility and warm-up joints and muscles that will be used in the forthcoming exercises.

Lower body exercises (20-30 minutes or as long as you want)

Squats x as many reps as you can for 3-5 sets
Lunges x as many reps as you can for 3-5 sets
Star jumps x as many reps as you can for 3-5 sets
Wall sits for as long as you can x 3-5 sets

Cool Down/Stretching (5-10 minutes)

Ankle circles for 30 seconds forward, 30 seconds backward with each foot
Arm circles for 1 minute forward and 1 minute backward
Jog in place for 2 minutes

Stretch your quads, hamstrings, calves, abdominals, arms, chest, shoulders, and back through a variety of basic stretches to stretch muscles out after the workout.

Total Body Workout Sample #3 – Total Body Exercises

Warm-up (10-15 minutes)

Perform the following in a continuous motion for at least 10 minutes with 30 second intervals performing each exercise, followed by 30 seconds of jogging in place between each exercise:

• Ankle circles for 30 seconds forward, 30 seconds backward with each foot
• Arm circles for 1 minute forward and 1 minute backward
• Jog in place for 1 minute and swing your arms in and out and side to side to loosen up
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• High knees for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Heels to glutes for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Jumping Jacks/Jills for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• High skips for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Squats for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Lunges for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Invisible jump rope for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Star jumps for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 30 seconds
• Speed skaters for 30 seconds
• Jog in place for 1 minute and swing your arms in and out and side to side

Stretching (5-10 minutes)

Stretch your quads, hamstrings, calves, abdominals, arms, chest, shoulders, and back through a variety of basic stretches to loosen up after the warm-up. Stretching is not to be overlooked and should be performed once some form of preliminary exercise has been performed to increase circulation, improve flexibility and warm-up joints and muscles that will be used in the forthcoming exercises.

Total Body Exercises (20-30 minutes or as long as you want)

Mountain climbers x as many as possible for 3-5 sets
Burpees x as many as possible for 3-5 sets
Star jumps x as many as possible for 3-5 sets
Jump squat + push-up combo x as many as possible x 3-5 sets

Cool Down/Stretching (5-10 minutes)

Ankle circles for 30 seconds forward, 30 seconds backward with each foot
Arm circles for 1 minute forward and 1 minute backward
Jog in place for 2 minutes

Stretch your quads, hamstrings, calves, abdominals, arms, chest, shoulders, and back through a variety of basic stretches to stretch muscles out after the workout.

Recap

You all have your own unique goals to change your current level of health and fitness into something that you desire and strive for. Some of you will build muscle and others will get more shredded than you’ve ever been by leaning out as a result of your tailor-made approach to burning fat. Whatever you aim to accomplish, I am confident the exercise programs listed above will help you get there. Regardless of the style of training you decide to pursue, make an effort to document it in a training journal, whether a physical one as mentioned previously, or online. I have training and nutrition journals available on my website, www.veganbodybuilding.com, to help you stay consistent and accountable to follow through with your goals. They are designed to keep you motivated and inspired with their unique approach including images, tips, quotes, and featured athletes, among the actual journal pages to record your workouts and meals.

Feel free to join our online plant-based athlete communities as well. We have numerous resources for you to record your training and nutrition journals online where you can get feedback and input from others, and it is a prime environment for transparency to keep you moving forward. Links to all of our online forums are on www.veganbodybuilding.com.

Now that you are equipped with a plethora of helpful exercises, including demonstrations of many, it’s time to fuel your body and replenish, repair and rebuild through sound nutrition. The following recipes from numerous cookbook authors, chefs and athletes will provide you with the other part of the equation. Exercise is only half the battle, what you decide to eat will determine your overall health outcome. Wishing you all the best. Enjoy everything the plant-based kitchen has to offer.

*Hope you enjoyed this free chapter! Feel free to order Shred It! here: http://www.veganbodybuilding.com/?page=shredit*


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 Post subject: Re: Entire Workout Chapter from Shred It! (minus photos)
PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 1:10 pm 
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Rabbit

Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2015 5:19 pm
Posts: 10
Wow, some really helpful stuff in there thanks Robert!
I'm now inspired & heading off to the gym! :-)

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 Post subject: Re: Entire Workout Chapter from Shred It! (minus photos)
PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 11:31 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2005 8:05 pm
Posts: 21053
Location: Austin, TX
thecelticbatman wrote:
Wow, some really helpful stuff in there thanks Robert!
I'm now inspired & heading off to the gym! :-)


Thanks! So glad you enjoyed it.

Hope you had an awesome workout!

I have other threads in this section of the forum that contain samples from at least 4 different chapters from Shred It!.

Enjoy reading. :)

The Table of Contents and general information about the book is listed here: http://www.veganbodybuilding.com/?page=shredit

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