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 Post subject: Cycling shoes and pedals
PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 9:12 pm 
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Rabbit

Joined: Sat Dec 01, 2007 9:33 pm
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Don't laugh but I'm still really hesitant to give up my toe cages in favor of clip-ins. I have some long rides coming up, though, and want to increase my efficiency. What are your favorite (non-leather, of course) cycling shoes and pedals?

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:21 am 
I like Shimano shoes:) They suit a wide foot well or you can typically go down a size if you have a narrow foot. Also you can't even get a Shimano road shoe with leather in it. A few of their spin shoes have leather and maybe one mountain shoe but their road shoes are great. Plus they are the stiffest shoe you can buy(bike buyers mag rated them the stiffest shoe). I say go with the SH-RO85W. Its only $90-100 and its a great shoe. Its not super stiff like their carbon shoe so it'll be really nice on long rides...stiff but not super stiff. I train in an older model of the shoe and love it(I race with a carbon shoe). I have 40,000 miles on the shoe and I'm only now considering replacing it but only because I can get them for very little money. Being in Texas...I highly recommend these. Nothing beats a Shimano shoe when it comes to ventilation. They even have a hole in the bottom that I need to cover in the spring and fall because they vent so well.

If you have a narrow foot look at the Sidi Dominator 5 Women's shoe. People that fit well in Sidis swear by them. They don't fit me so I can't vouch for that but you can't deny the cult status of the shoe. It won't be quite as stiff as the Shimano but if its comfy for you go for it. Problem is...you get the Italian surcharge...everything from Italy is more expensive so this shoe is basically the same level as the Shimano for more than double the price. They also don't make many shoes with leather...especially not on the lower end(although their low end is very expensive). They're made with Lorica Leather(a synthetic). One thing to not...Sidi shoes have damn near no ventilation. This would kill me but I don't hear too many people complaining about it...but I'm also not in Texas.

When it comes to pedals I'm a bike Time fan...the time RXS would be a good beginner pedal for you. I love the fact that they don't seem to change their cleat...only the pedal. Look pedals are great but if they change the pedal in a year or two you may not be able to use old cleats(this if you have a few bikes you'll need to replace all your old pedals or buy used ones for new bikes). Both are pretty adjustable. Shimano Dura Ace/Ultegra pedals are great for the money...not the lightest pedal but very stable. If you have knee problems go with Speedplay Light Action pedals...they allow your foot to rotate naturally which is good for people with ankle/knee/hip troubles.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:25 am 
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I'm not laughing. Sometimes I still wished I had my regular pedals. :)
But the riding is smoother when you have a nice pair of pedals and road shoes.
Right now I have Specialized they're not all that great, I have problems with my foot falling asleep. And my pedals are SPD SL Shimano 105.
My next shoe is going to be Shimano. A friend told me that they can melt the shoe to your foot. Very cool and the cost is less then what I paid for my other pair.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:25 am 
They do have a moldable shoe...I'd try on one of the regular ones first though. The moldable ones are a bit pricer. More than anything it molds the sides...the footbed doesn't change much so I'd make sure that works out first. For me...the standard Shimano footbed couldn't fit any better so I'm not gonna need to get the high end ones.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2008 1:09 pm 
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Finch

Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2008 3:29 pm
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Location: Boise, Idaho
I bought a pair of Specializaed non-leather mtb shoes years ago and they have served me very well - including 3 24-hour relay races. I hope they are still making the quality shoes they used to. If the pair I have ever finally wears out I will buy some new ones.

I have always bought cheap pedals - Performance and Nashbar brand mtb pedals. I have been happy with them but I am not very picky about how easy it is to click in and out. The Performance brand pedals on my main bike took some getting used to, but now clicking in and out is second nature. I am happy as long as they are inexpensive and they don't break.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2008 6:24 pm 
Specialized still does make a good shoe but if it doesn't fit your foot bed it doesn't fit your foot bed. I love Shimanos and Nike's and Diadoras(most flexy inefficient shoe on the market but it is comfy for me) are the only others I've tried that fit well...the rest don't but I get a lot of customers that can't wear Shimanos...its a very personal thing.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:26 am 
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Rabbit

Joined: Sat Dec 01, 2007 9:33 pm
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Thanks VP, Tasha and Idahovegan. I rode with my toe cages again tonight but am getting closer to buying the clipless pedals. I personally don't mind the toe cages but people keep telling me that clipless is the way to go . . . is there really a big difference, in your opinion? And how often did you fall when you first started clipping in?

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:49 am 
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Stegosaurus
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Laura wrote:
Thanks VP, Tasha and Idahovegan. I rode with my toe cages again tonight but am getting closer to buying the clipless pedals. I personally don't mind the toe cages but people keep telling me that clipless is the way to go . . . is there really a big difference, in your opinion? And how often did you fall when you first started clipping in?


:lol: I was just telling Potter this story/ies I fall down the first time I got my pedals. It was really hard to clip in and out. And I just realize when I was in CA a month ago. Marty adjusted my pedals so it would loosen a bit. So over a year of not knowing that my pedals could be loosen I had to strugle clipping in and out of pedals. Now it seens like it's nothing.
Anyways the first day when I was riding with my new pedals, I was approaching a cross walk and these ppl were crossing. I knew to stop but I couldn't clip out. So big L on my forehead. I fell in slow motion in the grass. Potter said it was because I'm like a leaf falling from the tree of being so light. :P
A good way to practice, is I practiced indoors on clipping in and out of my pedals. I just put my bike on my trainer and practice while watching tv or reading. If you don't have a trainer, just put your bike against the wall or door way to hold on so you don't loose your balance.
I do have some extra pedals you can have, you just have to buy the right cleats for them.
Have fun Laura you'll like clip pedals a lot better :) You find you will have a more efficient pedal stroke, and you will find that you'll be using your lower body more and not so much stress your upper body. That's what I found anyways :D

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 3:59 pm 
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Elephant
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Figured this would be a good place to post this. I have Northwave cycling shoes for my click ins and The pegs are all worn out from walking on them. I emailed Northwave and asked how I could go about getting replacements and got no response. 2 weeks later (today), I just got a package in the mail from them witgh replacement pegs and they didn't even ask for a dime; how cool is that? Go Northwave!!!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 6:33 pm 
Cycling shoes make all the difference in the world. At least 1mph on average for short rides of an hour or less and probably more like 2mph for longer rides...that translates to a lot of extra time in the saddle compared to the rest of the people in your group. No sense in waiting.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 1:08 am 
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Gorilla

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2006 8:43 pm
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Location: Santa Cruz, CA USA
Clipless pedals/shoes are one of the best things--hands down--you can do to improve the quality of your ride, once you get used to them. I always equate moving to clipless as like going from a dialup modem to DSL or Cable Modem. You'll never go back. The power increase you experience and overall comfort (assuming you get the right shoes for you and your position on the bike is good) are 100 times better than clipons and any other shoe.

I ride Sidi shoes right now (mens, of course) but I don't remember the model. All synthetic, though. Paid a lot of money for them but they fit the best and I've had over two years of great riding in them.

I prefer the Look-style pedals rather than SPD, speedplay, or other types because I've found they hold my shoe better and psychologically it feels more secure.

You gotta make the leap into clipless. It's night and day. If anyone says otherwise they never tried clipless.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2008 11:31 am 
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Rabbit
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My local bike shop is in the process of ordering me a pair of Sidi Zetas, but I'm not sure they are going to fit...I wish they could sell you two different sizes based on left and right foot size difference (I guess that's where the idea of moldable shoes come in). I did try a pair of Sidi Genius 5s and those were ridiculously comfortable and had a great sole. I loved the SL buckle strap at the top, but it's not ideal for triathlons. : (

Anybody riding Look KEO pedals? I want to upgrade from my shoddy, stock Wellgo RC-713s.

Sorry Laura, not trying to hijack your thread! : )


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2008 9:19 pm 
You'll fit well in the Zeta's if you liked the Genius line...the inner footbed is the same. As for the different shoe size thing the mold only helps so much. If you're feet are different by more than 1/2 size you really should buy two shoes(its not cheap but its the best thing for you). Just like different leg lengths. If you have a leg more than 1.5cm longer than the other you should have a different length crank on each side. When it comes to buckles and tri shoes...tri shoes are only advantageous to sprint triathlon competitors. If the bike leg of your race is 40k or longer you actually lose the time advantage of having one strap compared to three.

Look Keo Pedals are great pedals. I don't ride them but everyone at my shop does. Pretty much all major clip in companies make a good pedal these days. Time, Shimano, Look, Campy, Speedplay...all have good characteristics. They're just different...none are really better than the other. The only obvious differences up front are that some are lighter than others...and if you have bad knee issues....Speedplay is the best pedal for you. If you don't have knee problems and don't care about a few grams of weight...I'd shop by appearance and you're budget. Bang for the buck...you can get the best Shimano Pedal for $200...the best Look and Time pedals are both over $400.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 9:26 pm 
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Rabbit

Joined: Sat Dec 01, 2007 9:33 pm
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I finally went clipless and it's great. Three long rides and at least so far I haven't forgotten to unclip when stopping. A couple of close calls, though, lol. I went with Shimano mtn bike shoes and Time Atacs (I wanted to be able to wear the same shoes on my road and mtn bikes). Thanks everyone for all your advice and encouragement. I can't believe I stayed in those toe cages so long; clipless is so much better.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:50 pm 
Nice to know your riding clip less while mountain biking too. I suggest keeping things as they are for a few months but you should eventually give road pedals/shoes a try...much more efficient and a more stable pedal platform.


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