nutrition help

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muhaha
Rabbit
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2005 12:52 am

nutrition help

#1 Postby muhaha » Fri Dec 23, 2005 1:00 am

i've been eating sandwich with whole wheat bread stuffed with veggies like cabbage and brocoli and carrot cole slaws and veggie dogs(15gram protein each) for almost a month, i try to eat it every 2-3 hours to replenish my carbs and protein

my breakfast
sweet potato, one of avocado, apple or orange

lunch, sandwich

snack sandwich

snack again with apple or fruit

dinner
brown rice, steamed vegetables, tofu, soup(sometimes)

snack before sleep: sandwich

and water throughout the entire day to my best ability

is there anything i'm missing?
btw, i eat a lot of veggie dogs from yves veggie cuisine
hope nothing wrong with that

Jay
Gorilla
Posts: 897
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
Location: West Virginia

#2 Postby Jay » Fri Dec 23, 2005 10:31 am

Make sure to get adequate fat. Avocados are good (but expensive) Maybe get a handful or two of nuts/seeds. Flax seed oil to balance out omega 3/6 ratio.

It's look like you're getting almost all your protein from soy. I don't know if that's so great. Might be good to replace some of the soy with other things like lentil soups, beans, quinoa, etc. Also protein is an overrated concern. Look around some, use the site search function to learn more.

Kathryn
Elephant
Posts: 1484
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2005 12:23 pm
Location: Illinois

#3 Postby Kathryn » Fri Dec 23, 2005 10:52 am

I always think it's a good idea to vary your diet from day to day. By having the same sandwich all the time, you are limiting your food choices, and soy hotdogs are processed foods, made, usually from isolated or concentrated soy protein. Some studies show that isolated/concentrated soy proteins may increase risks of certain reproductive cancers (but WHOLE soy foods do not, and in fact protect against them).

Vary your protein sources: lentils, tempeh (soy, but more digestible than most, and a WHOLE soy food rather than a processed one), beans, hemp (as protein powder, or in other foods--sprinkle the "hemp nuts" --hulled hemp--on salads or in soups).

Some breads are higher in protein than others as well (I like "Food For Life" sprouted grain 'hamburger' buns, with 9 gm. of protein per bun, spread with some nut butter for healthy fats and some protein).

Also, try some different veggies: try to get a variety of colors of veggies and fruits during the day (red, blue/purple, orange/yellow, white, green) as each color reflects a different nutrient (ie: red foods have lycopene and vitamin C).

Yams are great! So are avocados (my most recent favorite "snack": two slices of sprouted hemp bread with 1/2 avocado mashed between them).

Jay
Gorilla
Posts: 897
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
Location: West Virginia

#4 Postby Jay » Fri Dec 23, 2005 3:09 pm

Kathryn wrote:So are avocados (my most recent favorite "snack": two slices of sprouted hemp bread with 1/2 avocado mashed between them).

That sounds good.

Aaron
Elephant
Posts: 1242
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2005 10:57 pm
Location: Portland, OR

#5 Postby Aaron » Fri Dec 23, 2005 3:46 pm

yes it does. very good.


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