Vegan Bodybuilding & Fitness

Healthy Food Defines You
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2006 4:17 pm 
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Elephant

Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2005 12:23 pm
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Location: Illinois
veganpotter wrote:
I love the 80/20 all the time...but I think going raw in the warm season and cooked in colder seasons is probably nearly as good so long as you avoid too much high acid foods in the winter


I agree.

Raw is definitely more appealing during warmer weather as well.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 6:24 am 
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Rabbit

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2006 8:49 pm
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I think 80/20 is best, too. Adherence is easier than for a 100% raw diet. I don't know about others but I no matter how good my intentions, I always blow it first thing in the morning when I put soymilk in my coffee.

I see no reason why cooked beans should be avoided. Ditto for cooked sweet potato, some lightly steamed cruciferous vegetables, and even some cooked whole grains. Especially in winter!

From the glycotoxins standpoint, cooked fats are the worst, cooked proteins in the middle, and cooked carbohydrate foods, the least bad.

The only bad thing about cooked whole grains to me is that they aren't as nutrient-dense as vegetables. Most healthy vegans would do better to increase raw vegetable intake and this usually means decreasing the less beneficial foods.

But athletes do need more concentrated sources of calories; whole grains that are cooked can be used to fill the need after lots of raw fruits and vegetables and nuts/seeds and legumes are used.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 10:21 am 
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Elephant

Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2005 12:23 pm
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Location: Illinois
moai wrote:
From the glycotoxins standpoint, cooked fats are the worst, cooked proteins in the middle, and cooked carbohydrate foods, the least bad.

The only bad thing about cooked whole grains to me is that they aren't as nutrient-dense as vegetables. Most healthy vegans would do better to increase raw vegetable intake and this usually means decreasing the less beneficial foods.

Can you expand on the idea of "glycotoxins"? (glyco-sugar?).

I agree that most grains (especially wheat) are not very nutritious (and are overused in the US). Certainly not enough to hold the largest place on the food pyramid!

The most nutritious 'grains' seem to be those that are actually 'seeds' (buckwheat, quinoa, not sure about millet as far as it's botanic category). Wild rice is also good.

I think for grains, people should definitely think beyond the most-oft-used wheat, rye and oats (which are often the most hybridized, usually not to increase nutrient content, but to make them more beneficial for the producers in some way) and go for grains like teff, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, even spelt or kamut (more nutritious, non-hybridized cousins of wheat).


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 2:07 pm 
If I were somewhere warm and I had raw foodies to prep food with all the time I'd love to see how I would feel being completely raw so long as I could afford it. My biggest problem is loving cooking and being broke...otherwise the truly raw month I had was amazing...but the 80/20 feels almost as good. My body performs nearly as well but I just don't feel as purified during the day when I'm just working in the studio or relaxing. I still feel much better than when I'm on my normal cooked vegan diet but not quite as good as the all raw


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 5:13 am 
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Rabbit

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2006 8:49 pm
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Kathryn wrote:
Can you expand on the idea of "glycotoxins"? (glyco-sugar?).


Advanced glycoxidation end products (AGEs), derivatives of glucose-protein or glucose-lipid interactions, are implicated in the complications of diabetes and aging. Diet can be a significant environmental source of AGEs, which may constitute a chronic risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney damage.

AGEs are produced endogenously from the nonenzymatic (haphazard, not requiring enzymes) glycation of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. AGEs can also form from lipid peroxidation, to form advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs). Recent studies have measured that about 10% of diet-derived AGEs are absorbed and correlate with circulating and tissue AGE levels. Dietary AGE restriction resulted in significant reduction of circulating AGE levels and disease progression in animal models of atherosclerosis and diabetes, as well as in diabetic patients with normal renal function and in nondiabetic patients with renal failure. These findings suggest that dietary AGEs may constitute a chronic environmental risk factor for tissue injury.

In the following table, foods were prepared for standard cooking times with commonly used cooking methods: boiled in water (100°C), broiled (225°C), deep fried (180°C), oven fried (230°C), and roasted (177° C).


Food item AGE (kU/g or /mL of food)

Fats:
Almonds, roasted 66.5 kU/g
Oil, olive 120 kU/mL
Butter 265 kU/g
Mayonnaise 94 kU/g

Proteins
Chicken breast, broiled×15 min 58 kU/g
Chicken breast, fried×15 min 61 kU/g
Beef, boiled×1 h 22 kU/g
Beef, broiled×15 min 60 kU/g
Tuna, roasted×40 min 6 kU/g
Tuna, broiled×10 min 51 kU/g
Cheese, American 87 kU/g
Cheese, Brie 56 kU/g
Egg, fried 27 kU/g
Egg yolk, boiled 12 kU/g
Tofu, raw 8 kU/g
Tofu, broiled 41 kU/g

carbohydrates:
Bread, whole-wheat center 0.54 kU/g
Pancake, homemade 10 kU/g
Milk, cow, whole 0.05 kU/mL
Milk, human, whole 0.05 kU/mL
Enfamil (infant formula) 4.86 kU/mL
Apple 0.13 kU/g
Banana 0.01 kU/g
Carrots 0.1 kU/g
Green beans 0.18 kU/g

It can be seen that cooked fats are highest in AGEs, uncooked carbohydrates lowest, and cooked proteins, intermediate. Uncooked proteins are also relatively low in AGEs compared to cooked proteins. Using this knowledge regarding AGE sources enables individuals to reduce a previously unrecognized dietary risk factor that contributes to the pathologies in normal aging, diabetes, and kidney disease.

AGEs (advanced glycation end products, either exogenous--preformed from the diet, or endogenous--produced in the body) accumulate in the dermis and accelerate photaging. Denatured (cooked) proteins are more likely to glycate once ingested. Cooked fats are worse,

Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been reported to accumulate in the dermal skin. AGEs hastened photoaging of the skin by means of active oxygen species such as *O(2)(-), H(2)O(2), and *OH, generated during UVA irradiation.

AGEs decrease both hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis and activity of elastase-type matrix metalloproteinase (ET-MMP).

refs:

food--
Goldberg T, Cai W, Peppa M, Dardaine V, Baliga BS, Uribarri J, Vlassara H, Advanced glycoxidation end products in commonly consumed foods, Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Aug; 104 : 1287-91, PMID: 15281050

skin--
Okano Y, Masaki H, Sakurai H., Dysfunction of dermal fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the contribution of a nonspecific interaction with cell membrane and AGEs., J Dermatol Sci. 2002 Sep;29(3):171-80

There are many more studies. You can google or search pubmed for exogenous glycation or glycosylation. The ill-effects tend to be much more pronounced in diabetics than in normals.


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