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MNP 100% Muscle (4 Rules And 34 Selected References)


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Hiya,

 

I've just put together another blog post about MNP. This one's got it all, the 4 rules for MNP, some practical links, and tons of scientific references, including direct links to 14 full studies in .pdf format! If you are interested in maximizing your body recomposition results, give it a read. Thank you

 

I'm realizing that writing my blog will help at least one person reach their goals a lot faster (ME, hehe!!). It's an interesting experience, and I highly recommend it to anyone with detailed knowledge of a particular subject.

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I'm not sure where the 100g of protein a day number is coming from. You say:

Don't believe the hype - bucketloads of protein are not necessary, and as demonstrated by the studies I've cited, protein intake greater than 90-100g/d is not necessary for large muscle gains, and in fact can be counter productive.

But I don't see that from what you are referencing. I see the studies that compare high and low fat, but protein is kept constant. There's the J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2002 Sep study where you talk about a PRO/CHO vs. a CHO group, showing that the CHO group gained more muscle and lost more fat, but that talks about supplements taken in addition to their "regular diets". Does this study define what their overall diets looked like?

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I think the 5% number is a bit low, but there's nothing saying you must eat handfuls of nuts each day. EFA requirements are only a few grams per day. The WHO recommends a minimum 15% calories from fat, but I think overfeeding may change that.

 

Dean Ornish claims we require only 4-6% of our calories to be from fat.

 

I haven't done much research on this myself, but it doesn't sound completely unreasonable. There's plenty of contradictory information out there.

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i thought fat was good for you, omega 3 fatty acids help joints, eyes, brain... what about nuts? they are good for you. also splenda is not the best choice, you should try the herb stevia

 

My new post deals with extensively with essential fatty acids and a couple more things (see the section "Essential Fats: Blown Way Out Of Proportion"):

http://veganmaster.blogspot.com/2008/08/muscle-gain-during-energy-deficits-good.html

 

I find stevia yucky! If you are eating a low-fat, starch-based vegan diet a little splenda or lots of non-organic food isn't going to bother you at all, you have to keep things in perspective. Certainly, I'd rather not eat it, but I start crawling up the walls because without it, because basically I am a sugar holic who eats almost no simple sugars (even adding a little salsa to my fat-free refried beans is a sugar "treat" - same with unsweetened soymilk, lol).

 

Chrisjs, I'm still cutting but my new favorite is fat-free crackers dipped in fat-free refried beans! Or last night we had baked potato slices dipped in a mixture of flour, water, salt and all purpose seasoning (sprayed with just a touch of oil) plus boca burgers on a no-oil added bread I'm tracking my diet carefully now, fasting until 3p.m. and then eating under 1500kcal in the evening. I'm down to 154 now, and will reach my goal in a couple weeks (around 147 probably). Then I'll finally get to begin MNP!! I can't wait. This cut has taken awhile as it's my first (I started at 172). I've lost about 5 lbs just in the last 8 days. I'll be glad when my beginning pics are up and I can focus on implementing MNP 100% Muscle! For me I'm gonna load up on crackers, rice, flour, legumes, bean thread noodles + "teriyaki" soy sauce (a little splenda added).

 

I've been tracking macros during the last week or so of this cut and I have been a little lax consuming 16% FAT 67% CHO 18% PRO. The reason is I've been indulging my sweet tooth by eating unsweetend soy milk with rice puffs/corn puffs/wheat puffs and splenda. But I'm getting excited now that my muscles are showing. And when I am ready to pack on the muscle I'll be super strict, shooting for 5-7% kcal from FAT. I'm working on more posts, about postabsorptive metabolism/fasting and exercise.

 

I'll be creating a much more detailed plan eventually, as I know I can estimate some specific numbers fairly accurately, as the studies give some good data.

 

Oh, I got my first asshole comment on my blog, lol! I had allowed anonymous postiing, but this person obviously didn't read a thing I had written, and just felt like wailing in my general direction "I don't see huge pictures of you, therefore all your fancy words and scientific studies must be wrong!" If they had read my blog they would have noticed where I mentioned that I'm just beginning my journey. The difference is, my pathway is lighted with science instead of popular misconception.

Anyone with that attitutde is going to have a hell of a time telling the difference between popular dogma and objective reality. I got a google alert showing someone had posted my blog on a low-carb forum, so they probably didn't read anything and just posted their knee-jerk response. So I don't allow anonymous posting anymore, lol, just to calm my male hormones, hehe. Damn evolutionary psychology - our brains don't realize that you can't get hurt over the net, all they know is someone is spewing anger in our direction and that we'd better pay attention to it cuz there could be a fight! I'm not worried, once I'm satisfied with my body fat level, I'm going begin growing muscle. But even if I was already huge, that shouldn't matter, the whole point of my blog is to encourage people to go with the evidence without regard for popular opinion or anecdote. That's why I link directly to full scientific studies that usually use the gold standard method of determining oxidation rates (calorimetry).

Edited by veganmaster
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can i see example of what you eat in a day? what about the nutrients in veggie's and fruit? won't you body be missing minerals an vitamins?
Why veggies and fruits wouldn't be part of a hi-carb, lo-fat diet?

he says to avoid simple sugers (fruits) and eat starchy veggies like potatoes and grains

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I think what he means is that with this diet, we should focus on starch veggies to make sure having some, otherwise someone having too much greens like spinach etc won't have enough of the starchy veggies. As for fruits, they should really be part of this diet (my opinion) especially pre-workout and post-workout. Simple sugars don't need to be avoided (especially natural sugar from fruits) eventhough complex carbs are privileged with this diet. But VeganMaster avoid fruits and simple sugars because of his teeth.

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he says to avoid simple sugers (fruits) and eat starchy veggies like potatoes and grains

He never says not to eat fruit. He is claiming that overfeeding on starches and limiting simple sugars keeps insulin elevated, causing the body to utilize more protein, and not store carbs as fat.

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viewtopic.php?f=35&t=13644&start=30

 

"I haven't read his book yet, but his program appears to use the basics of human metabolism very well. Most of the evidence on my blog supports his diet, except for the fact that it is high in simple sugars. Still, the major thing for a healthy muscle-building diet is to maximize the ratio of CHO:FAT in the diet, using plant foods, and his plan does that well. Fruit is easy to digest, so if you can afford to overfeed on it you can build muscle without the fat (especially with exercise). I think my blog would be of interest to anyone thinking about 80/10/10, as the scientific evidence heavily supports what that guy is doing."

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Can foods be strictly categorized as having carb calories being from "starch" vs. "simple sugar"? Isn't there a difference between the way fruits are metabolized and the way the sugar in foods containing table sugar, such as iced tea or lemon pie, is metabolized? Certainly the fiber content should make a difference. Are all the carbs in fruits simple sugars? I seem to recall that they contain complex carbs as well. Likewise, "starchy" foods such as pasta contain simple as well as complex carbohydrates, just in different ratios than fruits.

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Just thought I'd point out, Splenda isn't Vegan.

It has been tested on animals.

There are a lot more ethical and natural sweeteners out there.

Err?

 

Veganmaster in an earlier post mentioned he eats splenda aka sucralose (see below).

Splenda isn't vegan, it was tested by Huntington Life Sciences and other companies for over 20 years in the USA and the UK. This testing involved feeding sucralose to Monkeys, Dogs, rats, mice and other animals and then assessing the effect it had on them, by sampling there blood and urine, and then killing the test subjects by anaethisa and exsanguination so that there internal organs could be tested.

 

I find stevia yucky! If you are eating a low-fat, starch-based vegan diet a little splenda or lots of non-organic food isn't going to bother you at all, you have to keep things in perspective. Certainly, I'd rather not eat it, but I start crawling up the walls because without it, because basically I am a sugar holic who eats almost no simple sugars (even adding a little salsa to my fat-free refried beans is a sugar "treat" - same with unsweetened soymilk, lol)
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Can foods be strictly categorized as having carb calories being from "starch" vs. "simple sugar"? Isn't there a difference between the way fruits are metabolized and the way the sugar in foods containing table sugar, such as iced tea or lemon pie, is metabolized? Certainly the fiber content should make a difference. Are all the carbs in fruits simple sugars? I seem to recall that they contain complex carbs as well. Likewise, "starchy" foods such as pasta contain simple as well as complex carbohydrates, just in different ratios than fruits.
http://www.southbeach-diet-plan.com/glycemicfoodchart.htm

Yes it's different. Basically, refined sugars (non whole grain pastas and bread, maltose in beer, doughnuts, etc) cause a higher level of sugar in the blood flow and the body respond by bumping insulin to try to put back the blood to normal, while natural sugars (in fruits, whole grains, beans, etc ) almost don't change at all the sugar level in blood, it stays normal.

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Unfortunately even stevia has seen numerous animal tests recently. Probably an order of magnitude different right now, but a few companies are working to bring stevia to market in the US as an actual food, so expect to see even more animal testing done with it in the future. I would imagine every non-sugar sweetener has had "food safety" animal tests done with it.

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