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L-Carnatine (for a healthy heart)


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I was listening to a doctor who is angle is nutrition and is a cardiologist. He found that these four elements made a significant change in the health of human hearts.

 

RIBOSE

VITAMIN Q or Coenzyme Q-10

Magnesium

and Carnatine

 

ideal supplement

for vegetable-

based products

Ulla Held

 

Excerpt of another article that explained.

 

With a strict vegetarian diet, the total amount

of ingested L-Carnitine is further reduced and was found to be

around 1-4 mg/day. The consequences of impaired L-Carnitine

ingestion upon vegetarian health and nutrition have received

relatively little or no attention to date in man. This is surprising as

the L-Carnitine requirements of the body are met almost exclusively

from the consumption of meat, with limited de-novo synthesis. If

intake of L-Carnitine is low, however, the body must almost entirely

rely on the endogenous synthesis to meet the needs. A vegetarian

diet is frequently low in some of the nutrients that are essential for L-

Carnitine biosynthesis in the body, such as the amino acids lysine

and methionine as well as iron.

Although a meat-reduced or vegetarian diet can be a healthy choice

and has various benefits, there are certain nutritional risks associated

with being a vegetarian. Dietary supplementation from non-animal

based sources is required to meet nutritional guidelines. Animal prod-

ucts, such as lamb, beef and pork, contain the highest amounts of

dietary L-Carnitine. Lower levels of L-Carnitine are found in dairy

products. In many plant foods, LCarnitinelevels cannot even be

detected. Strict vegetatrian therefore have negligible sources for

this nutrient.

 

Anyone know more about this?

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Carnitine is not an esssential amino acid. It's sometimes considered "conditionally essential" in that you might not be able to produce enough during periods of rapid growth/pregnancy.

 

They mentioned some vegetarian diets being low in lysine and methionine. This comes back to having a balanced diet - if you're getting high-quality proteins like soy, hemp, pumpkin seed or avocado, and balancing legumes and grains that have complementary amino acids, your diet shouldn't be deficient in lysine or methionine. Also, they mentioned vegetarian diets being deficient in iron - lame. It sounds like these people don't know about proper vegetarian diets, assuming you're not getting all your amino acids or iron. I've sometimes kept track of my iron consumption, and I get tons of it without supplements. I get my iron checked along with the rest of my blood work every year or so, and personally it's never been an issue. Then again, women (vegetarian or otherwise) are more likely to be iron deficient, so I don't have any personal experience on that front.

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If you eat whole plant foods in amounts large enough to satisfy hunger, you will meet nutritional needs and in fact be healthier than nearly all americans. Don't believe the propaganda, check out my first blog post. We are biological herbivores, and the evidence is clear that you don't have to worry about combining foods or eating pills to meet nutritional needs.

 

http://veganmaster.blogspot.com/2008/07/you-are-biological-herbivore.html

 

Pills and supplements can do very little for health, by defiinition. Whole plant foods are what create vibrant health for the herbivorous human primate. Gorillas and chimps don't take supplements to meet their needs, they instead eat whole plant foods regularly, which prevents all the "modern" diseases humans have due to their biologically inappropriate diet.

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Does this doctor have an angle in BS?

 

1. Carnatine required for healthy heart (an organ only animals have)

2. Carnatine not available from plants (they don't have hearts)

3. Carnatine available from animals because they synthesize it (including humans)

4. Some comment about incomplete proteins that was disproven long ago.

5. No actual evidence to suggest vegetarians have a higher incidence of heart problems.

6. Profit! (Sell more Ulla Held)

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I will just say that I supplement with carnitine during my cutting season, because I am not taking in large quantities of food to satisfy my hunger (mmmm, bulking season ). I also want to be proactive in my health and will take carnitine on occasion during the off season too. Scientists have found carnitine in tempeh, avocados, and wheat, but in less than optimum quantities. As someone who is a bodybuilder, that means I take my body to extremes, and I have to take my nutrition to extremes to keep up with the extreme demands I make on my body.

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Does this doctor have an angle in BS?

 

1. Carnatine required for healthy heart (an organ only animals have)

2. Carnatine not available from plants (they don't have hearts)

3. Carnatine available from animals because they synthesize it (including humans)

4. Some comment about incomplete proteins that was disproven long ago.

5. No actual evidence to suggest vegetarians have a higher incidence of heart problems.

6. Profit! (Sell more Ulla Held)

Firstly, I'm not sure what numbers 1, 3 are supposed to mean in this list. They are facts (and carnitine is present only in trace amounts in vegetables, so #2 can be considered a fact as well). Secondly, I'm not sure why you seem so dismissive of the information. The carnitine, ribose and CoQ10 combination has been used by innovative cardiologists, notably Stephen Sinatra, to markedly reduce death rates from heart dysfunctions. After seeing many patients die while on standard care, he used this combination and saved many lives. Granted, diet and exercise are key, but when heart energy levels are low and a person is ill or near death, these nutrients are quite literally a lifesaver. Also, Ulla Held is not a product. He is the author, and works for Lonza, a Swiss company that makes very high quality carnitines, which Dr. Sinatra prescribes and recommends.

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Firstly, I'm not sure what...

Ok, I am sorry for being overly harsh. But I'm going to remain skeptical on anything that claims vegetarians need to take some obscure supplement because their diets are low in some non-essential nutrient, especially without showing any actual risk.

 

I'm not saying this cannot be true, but I don't think any of us should be sympathetic to more unfounded fear mongering, we get enough of that already. If there is some foundation to this, I would like to see it.

 

The huge flaw I see in this claim is this supposition that vegetarians cannot synthesize enough carnitine.

 

When I search for "Ulla Held" all I find is some company at carnitine.com selling a supplement. Their site has a section for vegetarians stating that "in a study" vegetarians had lower carnitine blood plasma levels. No information about that study is apparent and I see nothing that suggests these lower levels of carnitine are too low.

 

Vegetarians often have lower cholesterol levels, cholesterol is necessary for testosterone production, and our bodies synthesize cholesterol. That statement on its own shouldn't imply we need to supplement cholesterol, and based on what I've seen so far I have no reason to worry about carnitine.

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