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How many grams of protein intake recommended


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Hi All,

 

First of all I need to admit that I'm not a vegan and I'm one of those, who strongly believe that you can't build muscle being a vegan. So though I'm a vegetarian by cultural background, still take dairy and eggs for my protein. I do weight lifting and take atleast 100 grams of protein per day. Now the question is, what are the primary sources of Protein in vegan diet and assuming I convert to vegan, how do I get my 100 grams of protein from vegan food.

 

Thanks

SK

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Building muscle as a vegan is no problem, as Jason said, check the profiles on the main site and see some of the physiques there. Also, if you check the progress section on the forum, you can see other people who are vegan, and see their progress.

 

Here is Jimi Sitko, who has won many of the body part competitions on this site:

 

http://veganbodybuilding.com/contest_chest_male.jpg

 

Regarding protein, there are lots of ways to get it and it depends on what you like to eat, and what your other goals are. Off the top of my head, nuts and seeds are good sources of protein, and are high in fat. Beans, rice, pasta, oats have protein, and are pretty high in carbs. There are various protein powders you can get which are very high in protein, which are convenient for most people to take, and I think that's the easiest way to get protein without other macronutrients. But some people don't like to take powders for whatever reason, personally I've found them to be great.

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Hi All,

 

First of all I need to admit that I'm not a vegan and I'm one of those, who strongly believe that you can't build muscle being a vegan. So though I'm a vegetarian by cultural background, still take dairy and eggs for my protein. I do weight lifting and take atleast 100 grams of protein per day. Now the question is, what are the primary sources of Protein in vegan diet and assuming I convert to vegan, how do I get my 100 grams of protein from vegan food.

 

Thanks

SK

 

 

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=11423

 

Also, check out the other stickies ( standing reference posts ) at:

viewforum.php?f=6

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I went through the US recommended protein intake which restricts protein to 10 - 15%. But There are many posts flooding in cyperspace which usually recommends the ratio of Carbs:Protein:Fat = 50 % : 30% : 20%. But US recommendation recommends more fat than protein. How could this be so contradicting. By limiting protein intake just to 50 - 60 grams per day, how are we going to repair the muscle tears after heavy weight training.

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How do you get 100 grm from a vegetarian diet?

How much eggs and dairy are in your diet in any given day?

Do you take whey powder?

 

 

Break fast: four eggs (One egg whole included, remaining 3 eggwhites) + Oat Meal + One glass Non fat milk = 30 grams

 

Snack 1 = Two Wheat Bread slices + Peanut Butter = 25 grams

 

Lunch = Rice + Beans + 1 Wheat flat bread = 20 grams

 

Snack 2 = One scoop whey + Two wheat bread slices = 20 grams (Before workout)

 

Snack 3 = Two scoop whey + Creatine = 30 grams

 

Dinner = Rice + vegetable + Fat Free Cottege cheese = 20 grams

 

Total = 145 grams of protein.

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Breakfast - Oats with Soymilk

Morning snack - Banana Protein Shake (Gemma or Pea protein)

Lunch - Salad with Tempeh

Post or Pre work out - Banana Protein Shake (Gemma)

Dinner - Chickpea and Seitan curry with Potatoes and Brown Rice and veggies

Total - 270g Protein (170 without the protein Shakes)

 

It is really very easy to get adequate protein on a vegan diet, and it is possible on a whole food diet alone (No Protein powders etc)

I have eaten 300grams of Protein in a day on whole food diet several times when bulking.

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Lots of protein will eventually undermine your health-acidifies your body which leaches calcium from your bones and creates buffer salts that lodge in your joints, and maybe kidneys. Many studies have been published that show the high correlation between hi dairy consumption-cassein- and osteoporosis. Animal protein is also a leading cancer promoter.

 

The body's principal requirement by far is energy-not protein building blocks. We need fuel to power our breathing, movement, heart pumping, body temp, and so on. Forget the protein cult-its hype designed to sell expensive junk like meat and dairy. Focus on simple carbs-the only macronutrient our bodies can burn.

 

Shoot for 80% of calories from carbs-mostly simple, and limit fat and protein to 10% max each. I eat well under 10% of my calories from protein and recover from lifting very well. You probably wont be the biggest guy in the gym, but you'll probably be the healthiest and possibly the longest lived, with a good quality of life. I've yet to be in a situation were my well above avg strength was not sufficient for day-to-day living. And at 48, I look like an 18 yr old jock and can do athletic feats I couldn't do 30 years ago.

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Focus on simple carbs-the only macronutrient our bodies can burn.

 

Shoot for 80% of calories from carbs-mostly simple, and limit fat and protein to 10% max each.

 

Even the ADA recommends a minimum of 20% for fat loss.

 

This vegetarian is not even vegan and has stated he/she doesen't believe that he/she can build muscle on a Vegan diet and currently consumes 100 grams protein a day.

 

I don't know his/her stats, but I can't see how offering extremes (no more than 10% protein for WEIGHT LIFTING) can encourage a self-proclaimed doubter of our lifestyle (he/she said they don't believe its possible to build sufficient muscle on a Vegan diet) to convince this person he/she can maintain muscle mass on a Vegan diet.

 

LrnWithFn... best sources of Vegan proteins are Seitan, Tempeh, High Protein Tofu, and Hemp, Pea, Soy, Buckwheat and Brown Rice powders. As sydneyvegan stated, its easy to clear 100 grams + without meat or dairy. Hope you'll consider giving the Vegan lifestyle a try.

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RawVgn, perhaps you "forgot" to mention that:

 

Alkaline foods (typically high in potassium relative to protein) increase blood pH, thus protecting bone. Vegetable sources of protein (other than grains and some nuts) are usually alkaline, while animal sources of protein are usually acid. Milk is approximately neutral, but cheese is even more acid than meat or fish.

 

LrnWithFn, I'd like to add to the "it's easy to get enough protein". I'm currently eating just whole foods (planning to order some protein powder in near future, though) and easily get 200-230g of protein daily (my kcal intake is about 2800-3200). Try seitan, tofu, tempeh, lentils, beans, peas, nuts, seeds. I also nail some wheat germ (mine is 45g of protein per 100g). Good luck!

 

 

*Source of the quote: http://www.vegansociety.com/food/nutrition/diet_and_bone_health.php

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LrnWithFn, vegan diets have been backed up by medical science for a while. There is a diet trend called raw foodism. It isn't backed up by medical science and in fact many of the writings on raw foodism contradict basic medical facts. Their ideas are not accepted by the majority of vegans and it isn't what veganism is about. Veganism was created by Donald Watson and his wife back in the 1940s and it is about an ethical belief that it is wrong to exploit animals. You are going to come across many raw foodists on the web giving all sorts of off the wall advice with a strong sense of conviction. Your best bet is to keep an open mind. If you are interested in anything they have to say back it up with your own research, off line, by reading things written by credentialed medical and health professionals.

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I'm certainly caught between two extreme worlds of body building . But its really nice to see a lot of good information flowing through. Though, I didn't try any vegan life style before, probably after going through some more posts in this forum, I would think about this. I might be clearly brainwashed about animal, dairy protein as I read in many journals and web resources (claiming it to be only the complete protein with all amino acids). But I may be wrong and there is other end of the world. Anyways thanks for the information and I would compare the point to point between animal and vegan protein to come to conclusion.

 

 

Thanks to you all.

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What's your motivation for considering a vegan diet? I think that's the most important thing, which should help determine what you do.

 

As per my cultural background, eggs are avoided (dairy is permitted). But I have a passion for body building and for that I need loads of protein to build muscle, which I believed can't be achieved by eating vegetables and milk alone. So I started eating lots of eggs. But it will always gets me into guilty feeling. So, if I could get enough protein from vegetarian food, then I can avoid eggs and if not 100% vegan, atleast I can become a Lacto -Vegetarian.

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Plenty of experts advise against exceeding 10% protein-Colin Campbell for example, perhaps the leading epidemiological nutritionist in the world. Face it, protein requirements are very low compared to energy requirements. I guarantee that nobody in here has ever met a protein deficient person, unless they were calorically deficient. If you eat enough calories of just about anything, you get plenty of protein. Eating too much protein is far more common and detrimental than eating too little.

 

Do your body a big favor and focus on fresh whole fruit and greens; you'll have mountains of energy, plenty of strength, and an incredible immune system.

 

Look at orangatanes: they're practically identical to humans genetically, five times as strong as us pound for pound, and all they eat is fruit and greens and some occasional roots. Protein is mostly just a big myth designed to make agribusiness rich.

 

And eating no more than 10% protein is not nearly as radical as you might think: the average American diet is only 16% protein, and even that's enough to cause many serious health problems-cancer, osteoporosis, and so on. Without eating concentrates, it is very difficult to eat large amounts of protein , because most concentrated protein sources are high in fat-meat, dairy, nut butters, and oils on starches (e.g. Earthbalance on bread) since they are otherwise largely tasteless. Add in cholesterol, low fiber and mineral and vitamin content, and saturated fat (assuming your omni) and look out!

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Plenty of experts advise against exceeding 10% protein-Colin Campbell for example, perhaps the leading epidemiological nutritionist in the world. Face it, protein requirements are very low compared to energy requirements. I guarantee that nobody in here has ever met a protein deficient person, unless they were calorically deficient. If you eat enough calories of just about anything, you get plenty of protein. Eating too much protein is far more common and detrimental than eating too little.

 

Do your body a big favor and focus on fresh whole fruit and greens; you'll have mountains of energy, plenty of strength, and an incredible immune system.

 

Look at orangatanes: they're practically identical to humans genetically, five times as strong as us pound for pound, and all they eat is fruit and greens and some occasional roots. Protein is mostly just a big myth designed to make agribusiness rich.

 

And eating no more than 10% protein is not nearly as radical as you might think: the average American diet is only 16% protein, and even that's enough to cause many serious health problems-cancer, osteoporosis, and so on. Without eating concentrates, it is very difficult to eat large amounts of protein , because most concentrated protein sources are high in fat-meat, dairy, nut butters, and oils on starches (e.g. Earthbalance on bread) since they are otherwise largely tasteless. Add in cholesterol, low fiber and mineral and vitamin content, and saturated fat (assuming your omni) and look out!

 

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/131/319047856_dbf1ef3e92.jpg

 

You just "forgot" to comment on my earlier post AGAIN, right? That's one. Two, MINIMAL requirements for survival are NOT the same as optimal intake for individuals who endure great constant stress (read: weightlifting). Three, I don't know anything about orangutanes, but gorillas consume a MASSIVE amount of protein daily - the leaves they eat contain shitloads of it. Not to even mention the fact that comparing other species to humans (i.e. cherry-picking things that compliment a particular argument) is a load of bunk.

 

Just go here and check out the last post by ninearms.

 

Btw, mods, ban this guy.

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Under ideal conditions, gorillas eat fruit diets not starches (they're under severe habitat pressure now and have switched to non-preferred foods like many animals under environmental stress)-I eat plenty of green leafy veggies BTW. As I said before, I am much stronger than the vast majority of people; and I could be even stronger since I only lift about 1 hour a week. But why, I have a nearly ideal build and I enjoy excellent health and essentially never break a sweat!

 

I really didn't find your earlier post persuasive, like the notion that dairy is not acid forming. There is massive evidence that dairy acidity is the principle cause of the high rate of osteoporosis in the US and other high dairy nations like northern europe. Also, greens have a substantial RELATIVE protein content (percentage), but they are still low protein because they have VERY low caloric density. Comparing humans to other anthropoid primates, who are on average about 97% the same as us genetically, is a logical useful comparison. Also, most people in here have spent little or no time as low-fat raw vegans. I was a regular vegan and an omni, and I know, not only intelectually but from direct extensive experience, that low-fat raw veganism produces excellent health and fitness. And finally, screeching does not make your arguments more convincing; it just high lights their basic weakness.

Edited by RawVgn
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I think it is good and necessary that newbies are warned about raw foodist beliefs. I am sorry that many threads where they ask for advice end up being hijacked by arguments with raw foodists. This thread was about a newbie asking for help in getting bigger. Fair enough, VBB is a vegan body building forum.....not a place to talk about alternative health dogma. This thread was about that person and his questions. There are many raw food boards for talking about raw foodism. No offense.

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Wow, only your perspective is legitimate! Grow up. At least I don't pretend my opinion is the only one that can be usefully discussed. In the real world, there is a wide range of beliefs about health and fitness.

 

Some of us believe that focusing on hypertrophy often leads to poor health. And this website is about "bodybuilding AND fitness." IMO, anyone who sacrifices their health to obtain muscles bigger than needed for a great quality of life is making a mistake similiar to taking steroids. People should know that there is a large body of evidence implicating excess protein consumption in many health problems, and that protein deficiency, for all practical purposes, does not exist. And I haven't "hijacked" anything; I presented a reasoned alternative that the originator may find beneficial to learn more about. People can hold strong beliefs and coexist just fine with others.

 

The dietary school I belong to holds its beliefs as strongly as you hold yours. And instead of using cheap loaded rhetoric like "hijacked" and "extreme," you should debate honestly on the issues. Fewer than 1% of the overall population is vegan, so we are all extremists. Historically, minority views (extremism) have been very good for society-female suffrage, abolitionism, compulsory public education, heliocentric cosmology, and so on. The fact that a belief is extreme does not make it wrong.

 

Discussion is necessarily brief in a forum like this. For example, more than 100 studies have been published in professional journals in the past two decades implicating dairy in cancer and osteoporosis. Am I supposed to go dig up and repost all 100 plus journal articles and post them here? And that's just one point I made. If I fully substantiated every statement, we'd never get anything accomplished. My approach is to make the issue generally known so that an interested person can follow-up by studying the evidence. I've spent years learning about nutrition and health; recovering all the specifics every time I write is not possible.

Edited by RawVgn
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I give up. NOW I can definitely see that logic and science does not penetrate your dogma. You misread and misrepresent other people's posts so that their arguments would be easier to refute (straw-man argumentation). From now on, I will only talk to people who are able to listen, reason and back up their claims (which probably means about 95% of raw foodists are out).

 

And now you can write the last post and "win".

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