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Vegan Diet= no vitamin B12 naturally which means anemia?????


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I've been told this by various sources and I found that hard to believe. So with a little research, I mean very little research I found that Dong Quai has B12 as well as spirulina (blue green algae). They say information is only as good as the source which it comes from so hopefully if anyone has more insight on this, let me know.

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Take a b12 supplement and you will be fine. The body does not synthesize "naturally" occurring b12 from animal products any better.

 

That is only true if the body is able to use the swallowed B12. There are some people (even normal foodies) that cannot assimilate B12 that is taken orally. They lack the so-called intrinsic factor.

 

The B12 in foods like spirulina is considered to be a B12 analogue, that uses the same receptors in the body but has not the same function as the normal B12, thus decreasing your ability to absorb the real B12.

 

To be on the safe side you should let your doctor check your B12 levels every few years and if the tests show a deficit, either use a B12 supplement if your intrinsic factor is OK or let your doctor give you B12 injections.

 

As long as you know about the risk and how you can deal with that...you are doing fine...

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Thanks for challenging me to get more info, I really wanted to stay away from supplements and i think i found the answer tell me what you think:

 

Vegan food sources for vitamin B12 are known. One brand of nutritional yeast, Red Star T-6635+, has been tested and shown to contain active vitamin B12. This brand of yeast is often labeled as Vegetarian Support Formula with or without T-6635+ in parentheses following this new name. It is a reliable source of vitamin B12. Nutritional yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a food yeast, grown on a molasses solution, which comes as yellow flakes or powder

 

The RDA for adults for vitamin B12 is 2.4 micrograms daily (1). About 2 rounded teaspoons of large flake Vegetarian Support Formula (Red Star T-6635+) nutritional yeast provides the recommended amount of vitamin B12 for adults

 

This would be my second choice:

Another source of vitamin B12 is fortified cereal. For example, Nature’s Path Optimum Power cereal does contain vitamin B12 at this time and about a half cup of this cereal will provide 2.4 micrograms of vitamin B12

 

Once again i appreciate you guys helping me refine my information. I never knew that the anolouge (inactive B12) would prevent the synthesis of the live version. Which is very important to me. I feel amazing being able to become so knowledgable about what I'm putting into my body, I can't thank you guys enough!!!!

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The yeast is actually also enriched with B-12, though I have heard quite a few doctors and nutritionists (Klaper, Fuhrman, Novick, etc.) warn against relying on that as a sole source of B-12. Apparently it isn't fortified reliably. That combined with the cereal should be fine, as both will mix with saliva.

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Well, well cubby 2112. I must say you are well informed. I checked out Fuhrman and Klaper and I already see that I'll be visiting there pages as well. For now, I guess I'll just diversify my b12 intake and go slightly higher than the minimum intake since i do a high level of exercise. Your info was on point and now I can share it with my friends. Greatly appreciated.

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