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Cholesterol can be a good thing. Cholesterol a protein?


RAINRA
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Blah blah blah cholesterol is cholesterol blah blah blah cholesterol is cholesterol blah blah...why do we have hdl? well they call that the good cholesterol because it takes cholesterol away from tissue and keep it from killing you
What bullshit is this? He is just mumbling about how our bodies make cholesterol which is needed for cell membranes, steroid hormones, etc. No shit. He then sets up this strawman argument that cholesterol is going to kill you and the pharmaceutical companies are saying that you have to get rid of it. No. High cholesterol, particularly ldl, is linked to atherosclerosis. No one says that cholesterol is inherently bad for tissues, it's necessary for life, the problem is all about constricting the arteries.

 

And no, cholesterol is not a protein.

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High Deinsity lipoprotein.

 

A lipoprotein is a biochemical assembly that contains both proteins and lipids (fats cells). The lipids or their derivatives may be covalently or non-covalently bound to the proteins. Many enzymes, transporters, structural proteins, antigens, adhesins and toxins are lipoproteins. Examples include the high density (HDL) and low density (LDL) lipoproteins which enable fats to be carried in the blood stream, the transmembrane proteins of the mitochondrion and the chloroplast, and bacterial lipoproteins

 

I don't know that much about cholesterol but I will research as much as I can. I will see what the truth is.

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Blah blah blah cholesterol is cholesterol blah blah blah cholesterol is cholesterol blah blah...why do we have hdl? well they call that the good cholesterol because it takes cholesterol away from tissue and keep it from killing you
What bullshit is this? He is just mumbling about how our bodies make cholesterol which is needed for cell membranes, steroid hormones, etc. No shit. He then sets up this strawman argument that cholesterol is going to kill you and the pharmaceutical companies are saying that you have to get rid of it. No. High cholesterol, particularly ldl, is linked to atherosclerosis. No one says that cholesterol is inherently bad for tissues, it's necessary for life, the problem is all about constricting the arteries.

 

And no, cholesterol is not a protein.

 

This is why I don't look for medical answers on Youtube! Lool!

 

Peer reviewed studies and journals. Nothin' but the straight facts! Any kook can give a lecture and post it on Youtube.

 

Nothing against you, Rainra. I admire the fact that you're always trying to learn new things

It's just this video is terrible! hahaha!

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HDL and LDL help transport cholesterol and triglycerides in the body.

• HDLs help remove cholesterol from the blood to take it back to the liver to be reused. Besides that it seems not to really do much in order to prevent heart disease. Just means LDL seems to be more stagnant.

 

C-reactive protein (CRP) at high levels seems to be another marker for heart disease.

 

 

Now is it seem that inflammation is one of the direct causes of heart disease. There is a cause that creates inflammation. Sugar being one of them, high insulin levels in the blood and so on. Cholesterol or high cholesterol get a bad rep when it tries to help repair the inflammation. For the first time, we have hard clinical evidence that lowering inflammation lowers the risk of heart attack and stroke and cardiovascular disease," said Paul M. Ridker, a cardiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

 

As well as infection being a possible risk factor — possibly one caused by a bacteria or a virus — might contribute to or even cause atherosclerosis. The infectious bacteria, Chlamydia pneumoniae (klah-MID'e-ah nu-MO'ne-i), has been shown to have a significant association to atherosclerotic plaque.

 

For years, doctors have thought coronary artery disease occurs primarily when high cholesterol causes fatty buildups called plaques inside the arteries that supply blood to the heart, like clogging a drain. The theory holds that arteries slowly narrow and eventually get blocked, often by a blood clot, causing a heart attack.

 

But in recent years evidence has accumulated that inflammation, a usually beneficial response by the immune system for fighting off infections and healing injuries, also plays a key role. Too much inflammation, perhaps from being overweight, having high cholesterol, high insulin levels or suffering from a chronic low-level infection, appears to damage the lining of artery walls and contribute to the formation and rupture of plaques.

 

Refined sugar and other foods with high glycemic values jack up insulin levels and put the immune system on high alert. (The glycemic index measures the immediate impact of a food on blood sugar levels; surges of blood sugar trigger the release of insulin.) Short-lived hormones inside our cells called eicosanoids act as pro- or anti-inflammatory compounds depending on their type. Eicosanoids become imbalanced — that is, skewed toward pro-inflammatory — when insulin levels are high. As if this weren’t enough, high insulin levels activate enzymes that raise levels of arachidonic acid in our blood.

 

It also seems that to many omega 6 oils are inflammatory. And oxidized cooking oil. Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn quotes that oils are a main concern when it comes to heart disease.

 

Sources:

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4648

http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/circulationaha;99/2/237

http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/98/9/839

http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSTRE52S1EI20090329

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A50875-2005Jan5.html

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