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Beans Vs Tofu


aurovon
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Tofu is processed. You are going to get much better nutrition (vitamins etc.) from whole foods, like beans. Many beans are rich in iron, while tofu is normally low but varies (tofu typically 4% to 6%, some forms have 20%, in a serving versus beans which typically have 30%.)

 

I am not advocating to not eat tofu, but if a choice, go whole beans. Also, we likely get a lot of soy protein already, which makes the whole beans a more varied choice too.

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Nice. What kind of beans are the best? Does it really matter? I was thinking of getting whole black bean cans. Just heat them up and eat them right?

 

Black beans are good. Canned beans are easier to cook (just heat) but usually have lots of salt (check label - you can get unsalted but harder to find.)

 

Dried beans take longer to cook - some over an hour, or left soaking in water overnight. I found that Anasazi beans cook fastest (40 minutes.) I recently got a bag of 50 pounds of organic Anasazi beans for $70 shipped. Eating 1/2 a cup 3 or 4 times a week, it should last me a year. They have a good nutty flavor and texture, good iron and protein source.

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Black soybeans are good, and can be used as substitutes for black beans in recipes.

Edamame is whole, green soybeans.

Red beans and kidney beans are high in antioxidants.

 

I think a variety of protein sources is best, and whole foods better than processed, unless the process makes nutrients more available. For example, Tempeh is made from whole soy beans that are cultured. The culture ("mold") helps break down the proteins so they are more assimilable, and adds B12 to the product. Some people who have digestive problems from most soy can more easily tolerate tempeh.

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[Canned beans are easier to cook (just heat) but usually have lots of salt (check label - you can get unsalted but harder to find.)

 

I always drain and rinse canned beans to get rid of extra sodium. Just don't have time to cook beans! Though lentils and split peas are fast-cooking options.

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Beans, definitely!

 

I hate canned beans! I have a pressure cooker -- ok, TWO pressure cookers -- & I cook my beans in it. If I soak garbanzos for 4 hours, I can have fully cooked garbanzos in about 25 minutes.

 

Freshly cooked beans are so much better than canned, especially if you dislike salty foods as much as I do.

 

That said, there are some tofu dishes that I have come to love. Tofu scramble comes to mind.

 

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Raw garbanzo beans are good too. My Whole Foods store used to have them refrigerated but I have not seem them lately. They taste like a nut. I would eat a 1/2 a cup or so. They would be good on a salad also.

 

Ohhh, I'm going to look for those. When I was a kid, we grew pinto beans on the farm one year & I would eat them raw. My mother thought I was nuts, but I thought they were pretty good.

 

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  • 1 month later...

Tofu in general and all soybean based products aren't great for bodybuilders. They have estrogenic effects on males, and the protein that they do provide isn't the best of quality. I limit my tofu intake to 1 or 2 servings every two weeks. I get most of my protein from beans (tons of them, pinto, black, lentils, indian mug), pea protein powder, and nuts. I would seriously look into getting indian beans called "mug" by indians, but I dunno what to call'em in english. Eat lots of nuts, especially almonds and walnuts. And try to obtain some good quality hemp protein, it is supposed to be the best protein you can get.

 

Forget tofu.

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Its called "MUNG DAL". Its a kind of lentil.

 

Mung, Tuar, Udat, Chana / Chane, Kaali (black), Masoor.

 

These are all the Indian Dals (lentils) that I can remember for the time being...

 

hemp protein

 

??

 

 

Haha thanks my friend. Are you indian by the way, because that knowledge is pretty impressive. I'm indian myself and didn't remember all those names ahah!

 

Just to reiterate, those indian beans are extremely good for you. Especially the Mung kind.

 

Oh, and you've never heard of hemp protein? Look it up!

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Im Indian.

 

OILY? Hmm.. thats wierd.. Cant really tell without seeing/feeling ?

 

Is it just MOIST & hence STICKY?

 

Did you buy it from an Indian Store like that?

 

PS: The best thing I can remember if at all is.. MOISTURE/CONDENSATION can cause stickiness. Thats about it.

 

I did look up hemp. Wikipedia mentions its a derivative of Marijuana plant.

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I'm allergic to soy, so I think my answer might be a bit biased.

 

I eat some canned beans, but I have found ones with only 30 mgs of salt in a can (black beans, 2 servings). I have fresh beans, but they do in fact, take a while to cook.

 

I know.. Im lazy and need things done fast so I would go to the canned ones too.

 

This what my mom taught me..

1. Wash & wash properly.. maybe 2-3 times.. to ensure any chemical residue or 'insect / pest' repellant is washed out.

 

2. Soak overnight before the day of cooking (length depending on which one it is.. CHICK PEAS, KIDNEY BEANS, BEPeas, Black/Masoor usually take longest)

 

3. Cook in a pressure cooker for faster cooking (still takes a long time). I used to get back from the gym, put the SOAKED kidney beans on the cooker for 3-6 whistles, hit the shower.. come back and cook in a towel . Ofcourse, I was in shape then. Cooking everyday.. . Too lazy and busy travelling now.

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