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Do vegans argue more than non-vegans?


robert
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I think if you go to other forums, you'll see that there is a large % of people in general who want to be in conflict, not just vegans. It's all over the place. With veganism, it is a passionate moral belief that people have, and so they're more likely to get angry or defensive about it I guess.

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I think if you go to other forums, you'll see that there is a large % of people in general who want to be in conflict, not just vegans. It's all over the place. With veganism, it is a passionate moral belief that people have, and so they're more likely to get angry or defensive about it I guess.

 

 

I agree, Richard. People seem to love the drama of conflict. Personally, I prefer harmony. I speak my mind when necessary, but I don't look for confrontation.

 

It seems to me conflict has become a daily part of our culture. The "we agree to disagree" is meaningless in most cases. People want their view to be heard, but are rarely willing to listen to an alternate view. Civility, which was pretty fragile to begin with, appears to be diminishing.

 

A pet peeve of mine: the incredible lack of manners in our daily interactions with people we come in contact with. What happened to please, thank you & you're welcome?

 

I'm stunned at the number of store clerks who do not say 'thank you' at the end of a transaction. But when I listen to other customers interactions with these clerks, I guess it's not really surprising. They bark orders/questions to clerks without any courtesy whatsoever. Honestly, I don't know how anyone stands to work in retail! I fear I'd go postal.

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A pet peeve of mine: the incredible lack of manners in our daily interactions with people we come in contact with. What happened to please, thank you & you're welcome?

 

I agree completely!

 

Even kids trick-or-treating don't say "thank you" that much anymore.

 

A sincere "please" and "thank you" goes a long way. And they do become contagious. I found that if I let myself be affected by the "no-thank-yous" (people who don't seem to have the word "thank you" in their vocabulary), I get the same way. Whereas if I offer a thank you first, with a smile, it often gets returned.

 

Now, I can be a pretty cantakerous person: pessimistic, grumpy, b(*(@#ty, and can often be more reactive than proactive. But I find that I feel better when I am 'proactively polite"!

 

I hate it when I go out of your way to hold the door open for someone (a couple wrangling their kids, for example, or someone carrying a big load of groceries) and they don't even acknowledge it. As if it's not a favor you are doing them, but something they deserve or have an inalienable right to. I sometimes yell "you're welcome" at these people. (That's my cantankerous side kicking in!) Unfortunately, situations like this make me less apt to want to go out of my way to do the same thing for the next person!

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With veganism, it is a passionate moral belief that people have, and so they're more likely to get angry or defensive about it I guess.

 

This happens at very high levels, too. Yes, I do think that the vegan community is very fragmented and there is especially a lot of infighting among those who have the biggest voices. Some people get mean and childish and these are people you'd never expect to see or hear this kind of thing from.

 

I think it's partly passionate idealism and partly the very strong investments in particular belief systems and how best to implement those beliefs.

 

We think we know a lot but there is still so very much that we do not know.

 

I am not one to talk, either.

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This happens at very high levels, too. Yes, I do think that the vegan community is very fragmented and there is especially a lot of infighting among those who have the biggest voices. Some people get mean and childish and these are people you'd never expect to see or hear this kind of thing from.

 

I think it's partly passionate idealism and partly the very strong investments in particular belief systems and how best to implement those beliefs.

 

We think we know a lot but there is still so very much that we do not know.

 

I am not one to talk, either.

 

 

~~smile

 

I think young veg*ns are especially prone to a sense of having to defend themselves -- & on occasion being confrontational. They are suddenly confronted with family & friends of a long time acquaintance, confronting them about their newfound beliefs, their newfound convictions. Many are not confident or knowledgeable in their new belief system & come across as hostile or self-righteous. I was that way when I was a newbie veggie.

 

When you reach the point where veganism has taken root & is clearly a part of your essence, your true essence, then arguing with those who are not, becomes less an indication of who you are, but rather a part of a larger belief system, a desire to spread the kind & gentle message of veganism.

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