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How can I make gluten free vegan bread?


ChaserHUN
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I've been trying to search how to make gluten free vegan bred, but I couldn't find anything. Gluten makes the whole thing stick together. The cheapest flour I can get is corn flour wich is gluten free, I read somewhere that chick-pea flour makes it stick together. Any one tried it?

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it is very easy to make gluten free flat-bread/muffins. But you will never have that consistency of the wheat bread, forget it.

Basically, you mix corn flour (let's say 4 cups) with finely ground flaxseed (one spoon of seed), which is an egg replacer here. Then you ad some salt and baking powder if you use that. You have to have the consistency of a porridge. And then you oil baking tin, or muffin tin and put the mixture in it. And then put in the pre warmed oven on 180 Celsius to bake. And that's it. You can also add buckwheat flour, but not more than 30 %. So 70% corn and 30 % buckwheat.

This is from my web-site

white-corn and buckwheat muffins, with hummus and steamed collard. Yummy!

http://img121.imageshack.us/img121/8154/dsc00020jc.jpg

 

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

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It's also good without it. Just don't use only coarse cornmeal. It's best when you use 70% very fine corn flour and 30 percent coarse cornmeal.

I don't know if you have that in Hungary, but I prefer white-corn flour (I'm not talking about STARCH here, I'm talking about real whole grain white-corn flour). It's much sweeter than the yellow one, that is usually sold. White corn flour is also very rare here nowadays, and it's sad because it's traditional to make white-corn bread. Real peasant white-corn bread was made from flour, water and salt only. It was dry, sweet and delicious in my opinion. But most of the people today consider it too dry, because it's not fluffy like the industrial (unhealthy) bread with all the additives, they are used to.

How come buckwheat is so expensive in Hungary? Here it's not cheap, but also not too much expensive: 2 EUR for 1 kg.

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The bread on the link looks very good

 

You can try different mix of gluten-free flour... I always forget which grains don't have gluten... but Corn, rye, buckwheat, amaranth, soy, quinoa, hemp, millet... to have a wheat-like consistensy maybe try adding some soy flour, banana, coconut, arrowroot, hemp, a bit more water... anything fatty or wet to make it softer.

 

Here's a list of stuff with and without gluten http://www.csaceliacs.org/gluten_grains.php

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Rye has gluten in it

Here 1kg of buckwheat flour is 5,502 Euro

Growing hemp in my country is banned so I can't really buy things made from hemp or if it's imported it's also expensive

I only really can get the yellow corn flour and I can get corn groats.

Will it work with only yellow corn flour and flax seeds? I guess I should try it out.

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yeast is the worse thing next to meat and diary. It fights with natural occurring good probiotic bacteria in intestines, making your whole system more vulnerable to infections, especially respiratory. I know people who just improved their health when stopped eating bread with yeast. Wheat is also not that good, causes mucus. So the combo yeast-wheat is very bad. If you have to eat bread with wheat, my suggestion is Essene bread (sprouted wheat bread), prepared on low temperatures. When sprouted, wheat becomes more nutritious in protein, btw.

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baking soda: I don't know, really. I avoid it too, and use it very rarely, when I want to "impress" my guest with healthy baked goods. But normally, I really enjoy when I have to chew hard my bread.

According to macrobiotics, which I follow to some extent, baking soda is too much yin, and it means you get weaker if you use it too often.

I guess if you use it once in week or two, it's ok.

Best way to go is to give up baking in general, if you can, and cook whole grains.

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