Jump to content

Belt for deadlift


Recommended Posts

 

You don't need a belt, wraps, straps for any exercise, especially for light weights. I think a belt will in one way limit the development of lower back strength. It will help you lift heavier, but get too dependant on it and you'll increase chance of injury when you take it off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The belt is to protect already weak backs.
You could replace "belt" and "backs" with "wraps" and "knees" (or wrists depending what kind of wraps). Or "straps" (versa grips) to avoid poor "grip strength".

 

Unless you have serious knee problems, I doubt wraps will do shit during a deadlift. Also I wouldn't recommend using straps when trying to build up grip strength.

 

Bottom line is if you use any of these you are avoiding the problem, and your weak link is only going to get weaker by protecting it. The only reason you'd use them is if you don't care about a certain area but want to work others (you're failing on grip but don't care about building it - use straps to use more weight to hit back/hams more), or you're training for simply as high a weight as possible, as a number...for example a goal, or for a competition you're allowed to use some of this gear.

 

For a beginner, get technique down first, solid raw strength and give it a good run at hitting and breaking plateau's...at least identify your sticking points/weak areas first and then work on them.

 

 

Increasing your max without equipment will increase your max with equipment (and build everything up evenly including joint strength).

Increasing your max with equipment won't necessarily increase your max without equipment (and increases risk of injury without it).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The belt is to protect already weak backs.
You could replace "belt" and "backs" with "wraps" and "knees" (or wrists depending what kind of wraps). Or "straps" (versa grips) to avoid poor "grip strength".

 

Unless you have serious knee problems, I doubt wraps will do shit during a deadlift. Also I wouldn't recommend using straps when trying to build up grip strength.

 

Bottom line is if you use any of these you are avoiding the problem, and your weak link is only going to get weaker by protecting it. The only reason you'd use them is if you don't care about a certain area but want to work others (you're failing on grip but don't care about building it - use straps to use more weight to hit back/hams more), or you're training for simply as high a weight as possible, as a number...for example a goal, or for a competition you're allowed to use some of this gear.

 

For a beginner, get technique down first, solid raw strength and give it a good run at hitting and breaking plateau's...at least identify your sticking points/weak areas first and then work on them.

 

 

Increasing your max without equipment will increase your max with equipment (and build everything up evenly including joint strength).

Increasing your max with equipment won't necessarily increase your max without equipment (and increases risk of injury without it).

 

What's good for the gander isn't always good for the goose. I forget that,my advice came from a female prospective. I can barely get my hand around the bar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to dislike belts, now I find use in them for keeping my core more stable. A belt won't necessarily save you from injury if form is bad or you're simply trying to move too much weight, so number one, make sure your form is good and that you're lifting an amount that's adequate for your skill level at this point.

 

For me, a belt means that I activate my abs to a greater degree (something I never used to do), which keeps my form in a better spot. I don't find that I lift MORE with a belt, rather, I just feel more stable and am reducing my chances of injury by keeping my core as stable as possible.

 

It's not essential to use a belt by any means, and usually, I suggest that people avoid a belt until they get to where they're fairly advanced in their lifting. It's best to learn ideal form first before NEEDING external equipment to be in the best form possible, so if you do use a belt, use it sparingly, not like those people at the gym that keep their cinched up for hours on end and wear it tight even for trips to the drinking fountain

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I figured 35kg doesn't merit a belt yet. At what weight do you usually need a belt for deadlift/barbell row? When you lift at bodyweight?

I wouldn't even consider a belt for less than twice bodyweight.

 

If you are considering straps to help your grip, try holding off on using them until you absolutely need them during your workout. So if you're going progressive sets, don't use them until the heavier sets. Or, general, wait until your grip is fatigued.

 

And you can get your hand around the bar. It doesn't matter if you're female. My two year daughter can get her fingers around an olympic barbell, it's just a matter of having the strength in your grip to hold it. (Which she doesn't have... yet.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just echoing the above posts really, but im raw vegan and deadlifting 150kg for 5 without a belt. Form and technique are most important, just make sure you keep working on them, even when you think you have it. The majority of injuries occur from consistant repetitive poor technique causing wear and tear till something just goes.

 

The most I use is chalk and if im feeling unsure about my body one day I'll start out lighter and build up feeling the effect the increase is having on my body and how its being displaced through the body based on my technique.

 

Hope that helps

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The belt is to protect already weak backs.
You could replace "belt" and "backs" with "wraps" and "knees" (or wrists depending what kind of wraps). Or "straps" (versa grips) to avoid poor "grip strength".

 

Unless you have serious knee problems, I doubt wraps will do shit during a deadlift. Also I wouldn't recommend using straps when trying to build up grip strength.

 

Bottom line is if you use any of these you are avoiding the problem, and your weak link is only going to get weaker by protecting it. The only reason you'd use them is if you don't care about a certain area but want to work others (you're failing on grip but don't care about building it - use straps to use more weight to hit back/hams more), or you're training for simply as high a weight as possible, as a number...for example a goal, or for a competition you're allowed to use some of this gear.

 

For a beginner, get technique down first, solid raw strength and give it a good run at hitting and breaking plateau's...at least identify your sticking points/weak areas first and then work on them.

 

 

Increasing your max without equipment will increase your max with equipment (and build everything up evenly including joint strength).

Increasing your max with equipment won't necessarily increase your max without equipment (and increases risk of injury without it).

 

What's good for the gander isn't always good for the goose. I forget that,my advice came from a female prospective. I can barely get my hand around the bar.

 

I use nothing but chalk for the heaviest attempt on my deadlift day. I'm a 135 lb female, and I'm 5'1". I recently deadlifted 235. You might help your grip to improve by doing farmer's walks and plate pinches, but hey, if you like using straps, it's no skin off my nose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Use wraps or versa grips before you rely on a belt. The belt is to protect already weak backs. Also, make sure your hand and forearm strength are caught up.

 

agreed.

 

It'll come. Out of nowhere as you keep pushing through sticking points, the poundage will starting jumping. If it wasn't mentioned on a different comment, change your rep range around. More sets. etc etc. the usual stuff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...