Jump to content

Bulking phase


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 400
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Nice! What prompted the switch to Stronglifts? Just felt like changing it up a little? You'll be back up to heavyweights in short time!

 

 

Hi Asparagus,

 

         Thanks for that question! My main reason is simply, I could of built a better base.

 

I have made some terrific gains across my lifts & packed on some serious bulk & size in my time back in the gym. I didn't really have a plan for the first couple of months, then followed a few bullshit routines before educating myself. Likes of Rippetoe, Wendler,Tate being my favourite reads. Also T Nation & starting strength becoming my goto for info, along with dinosaur training.

 

I followed a strength program on builtfit which was based around basic plate loading before moving onto 5/3/1. 5/3/1 really is awesome & I made all my best gains while on this.

 

Saying that recently I re programmed my lifts, though I'm only back into cycle 2 I'm already not feeling the work I'm putting out. Stripping the weight (& I mean really stripping it off) I'm hoping to build a better platform.  So i'll go through stronglifts 5x5, go through the intermediate & advance, then madcow & finally back onto 5/3/1.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do respect and recommend Wendler's program, my only problem with it (and some powerlifters) is that it can be way to easy of workout. I follow a loose version of Wendler's program by doing more. You can still definitely get strong

 

EX. for Bench Press

 

Shoulder circles, 25 push ups, Back bends 25 push ups.

 

135 x 5

135 x 5

225 X 5

275 x 5

335 x 5

 

Then I'll do a tons more "accessory lifts" just dislike the fact you have to be so precise and that he freaks out on doing too many accessary lifts. IMO if you just do your strength stuff first, you're fine. There's so much more fun things I'd be doing in the gym that wendler seems to frown upon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess my point is that you can still build quality strength and excel in other areas at the same time. These seemingly "hardcore" powerlifters can lift but that's about it in the performance department. I train with a few of these types who put out unreal numbers but are really just overweight and couldn't do a pistol squat if their life depended on it. I respect a man much more if that put high strength numbers and still do an iron cross. That's the assistance work I'm talking about. Not to mention if you follow his nutritional advice you'll eventually be a prime candidate for heart surgery.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess my point is that you can still build quality strength and excel in other areas at the same time. These seemingly "hardcore" powerlifters can lift but that's about it in the performance department. I train with a few of these types who put out unreal numbers but are really just overweight and couldn't do a pistol squat if their life depended on it. I respect a man much more if that put high strength numbers and still do an iron cross. That's the assistance work I'm talking about. Not to mention if you follow his nutritional advice you'll eventually be a prime candidate for heart surgery.

 

That's where Wendler's bodyweight assistance program comes in. In his book he even states it as one of his favorite templates to use. It's also what I'm using. Something else that he stresses is figuring out a template that works for what you want to do. His program is really flexible when it comes to assitance, and the main lifts are just that, main lifts. Everything else you tailor to your goals. I think Veggie here made a good example of that when he had to program his lifting around injuries and was still able to use Wendler's 5/3/1 template.

 

Also, I don't think anyone on this forum would be directly following his nutritional advice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think saying powerlifter's are overweight is rather ott, I'll agree some use it as an excuse to eat badly more often than not. I actually train with one of the worlds strongest men & also guys whom compete in various strongman weight comp, None of these are fat (Loz is obviously a heavy weight).....Wendler also admit's he was powerful but out of shape. 5/3/1 is geared towards being fit & strong, that's why he says to condition with prowlers ect

 

As for powerlifer's being fat, I think Matt Kroc may have something to say about this Touching on Matt Kroc I used his assistance template recently along with 5/3/1's core planning http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/marine-corps-tough-battlefield-lessons-you-can-take-to-the-gym.html

 

 

I'm not blinded by these types (wendler ect) I know I have to add in work within area that needs help eg my midback for bench stability.

 

Lastly I have never seen Wendler's food/meal advice & thought it was ill advised, besides the meat obviously

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you serious on the gomad? This just peddles to my point that some of these strength diets are just excuses to obesity. I had a trainer who worked under me that did this and just left him with a inflated body and ego. He was the joke of the gym and soon was let go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So here's two stronglift workouts from Wednesday & Saturday. Should of been Friday but I've needed to be in close proximity to a toilet, no idea why I was & still am having a bad stomach  

 

I have the stronglifts excel & it's given me even lower numbers to start with than what I went with on Monday, so all's good & I'll stick with it. The stronglifts iPhone app is also great!

 

The works easy enough so I'm really focusing on form. Bench had become something that was starting to slip, like not fully touching my chest.

 

Wed-8th-August

 

Stronglifts workout B

 

squats: 67.5kg 5x5

 

Overhead press: 27.5kg 5x5

 

Deadlift: 70kg 1x5

 

Sat-11th-August stronglifts workout A

 

Squats: 70kg 5x5

 

Bench press: 50kg 5x5

 

Barbell rows: 37.5kg

 

Every lift I had 3-5 warm up sets....barbell rows were taken from the floor & returned to a full stop.

 

So there we have it, nice & easy...form being key while the weights ramp back up. Though I'm off for a break now, week off! My goals to eat loads of lemon cheese cake & burgers:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personal trainers are a joke in general.

 

K. You obviously haven't worked with one (or at least a good one). And considering you're following a strength program developed by essentially a personal trainer (Jim Wendler).

 

I don't mean to sound condescending, but when it comes to the general public and powerlifting/strength training I get very opinionated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been a PT for close to 10yrs, sure there are bad ones but in NZ most gyms have to employ REPS registered PT's. That essentially weeds out any 'dodgy' ones, plus every year we have to get re-certified so we are always being upskilled and constantly learning.

 

To label PT's as a joke, you must have either had a run of bad luck with them or the gym just didn't really give a shit who they took on. All the ones I have worked with/around have been pretty damn knowledgeable, I've learned heaps off them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sasquatch... I could care less if you listen to me, I originally just posted my opinion. As for my credentials and "esteem: I work training professional athletes,educating personal trainers, and obtaining my PhD in the area. I'm not here to have my ego stroked, just here supporting another area of health that is vastly misunderstood (vegan nutrition).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

His program works so I see no point in messing with it, when Some can match a 550kg you tend to listen to them.

 

As for assistance, if I do any I give them a reason. I don't just do them to fill an hour

Just thought I'd post this up mate, from a well respected lifter in the States that is strong as hell and has been using 5/3/1 on and off for a number of years:

 

"I think it's good you're looking to modify 5/3/1. Templates are good for a starting point but when you individualize something it will suit that person even better. Cookie cutters only work for so long. Like take my program, it's different than 5/3/1 b/c my program focuses on the assisting lifts and not the staple lifts (which is the opposite of 5/3/1). There are also other differences like my assisting lifts changing every 8 weeks. What I'm saying is I took ideas from many programs and my own ideas and put them together. I think that is the way to build the best program for yourself. You know your strengths and weaknesses better than anyone so you can create the best program for you. Just use a solid foundation to build upon it."

 

I thought that was a great post with good logic applied. I personally don't think it's a bad thing to change or tweak the programme to suit someone, but saying that I would be thinking more of someone that has a good amount of lifting experience behind them. If it's someone that's more of a beginner then sure, leave it as it is because it works well and it's design layout is pretty much fool-proof.

 

Just my 2c

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A post I left on here a while ago:

 

 

I have the second edition, I'm planning on reverting back to the programable assistance template for a couple of cycles. Had been using boring but big.

 

Assistance wise, I think bbb is a good place to start. As I said I did add in a couple of things (extra work) for areas I needed improvement. Once I touch 100kg on bench my stability can be off, so more upper back work. Cable rows one day & dumbbell rows on the second (last set performed as a Kroc row).

 

I don't think doing some light tricep push downs will hurt to much, long as your smart about it. I never track isolation, if I do any at all. Your body has no clue what it is you're lifing when you isolate. Let the big lift stress the mind/muscles & joints. Just do whatever on the day if you do any extra work/it shouldn't detract from the core of the program.

 

That's why I use cable rows one day (easier) then dumbbells the second, same as tricep work, I add it in with bench as if I did with OHP my bench may suffer... When you do  any assistance it needs a reason & plan it right.

 

 

My boring but big work last couple of cycles has gone:

 

Mon:

OHP 5/3/1

 

Assistance:

OHP bbb: 70% x1 60% x2 50% x2

Pull ups: 5x10 (between OHP sets)

Cable narrow rows (extra back work)

 

Tues:

Deadlift (light work did to back issue no 5/3/1)

 

Assistance:

Front squats: programmed from 2nd edition

Standing hamstring curls: 4x12

 

Thurs:

Bench press: 5/3/1

 

Assistance:

Bench press bbb: percentages as OHP bbb

Chin ups : 5x10 (between bench sets)

Tricep push downs: 4x15 (extra work) 

Dumbbell rows: 3x10 & another set (light) as a Kroc row.

 

Fri:

Squat 5/3/1

 

Assistance:

Squats bbb: percentages as OHP/bench

Standing hamstring curls: 4x12

Hypers: 3x10

 

Pretty basic work but it's to the point with minimal fuss...

 

 

So yes even I "tweaked" it to suit what I needed. My point is where people completely pull the core work apart.

 

What goes over people's heads is that you're meant to be conditioning pretty damn hard on 5/3/1...most people/blogs I see don't do this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share




×
×
  • Create New...