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What are you reading currently?


kollision
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That sounds kinda scary. Are you serious about the sociopathic remark? Perhaps misogynists instead of sociopaths? Are they really cruel?

Well, I guess you have to read it

Basically they have different schemes to get the target (their vocabulary). The schemes have two things in common though:

1. Lower the value of the target.

2. Raise the value of themselves.

Every move they make is planned out around these two points. Let her chase.

Mystery for example can do something like this:

When he goes in to the club he spots a target in a group.

He walks to another group and befriends them by certain phrases, magic tricks, pre made photos of him being in cool situations, etc. He does the hardes ones first, feminists and guys. If he is successful in befriending them, they will surround him and he will find a spot where he can lean back to a wall or alike and draw them to him.

After he has become the "alpha male" in this group, he goes to the next and repeats.

He can do this a few times to be sure the target have seen his value (he becomes "pre approved" by others).

He then walks up to the group with the target befriends everybody except the target. Instead of befriending her he will "neg" her (comments and gestures that in a funny way lowers her value). When she reaches for his attention enough he will "isolate" her and keep showing value (palm reading, magic, etc.) and keep lowering hers. She now starts seeking his attention (her value is lower than his) and he goes over to "fluffing" (small talk). After a while of this (he has exact times like 7-10 min. for each phase) he either "number close" (gets her number) or "push-pull" (touches her a little, look for IOI's (indicator of interest), draw back, touches a little more, draws back, etc.). He then "kiss closes" the target (he asks "You want to kiss me, don't you?" and have a pre planned way to deal with any answere).

He does this exact scheme every time he is "sarging" (chasing women). He "field tests" new things sometimes to get better.

 

To be able to do this he of course have to distance himself from the initial male instinct to just run up and buy her a drink

 

Others (like Tyler Durden) uses other methods. He "out-alphas" the natural alpha in the group by lowering his value and takes his place. He can be really mean while doing this. He then belittles and ignores the target.

 

Allthough the schemes varies a bit they are all like mathematical formulas. They follow their scheme exactly the way it's planned out. Feelings stays out or they will fail.

 

What I meant with "sociopaths" is that the goal is to mimic sociopathic behaviour by freezing out their feelings.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Offense, perhaps they are just born that way, and merely Psychopaths instead?.

 

Just finished, What Your Doctor Hasn't Told You and the Health Store Clerk Doesn't Know, the truth about alternative treatments and what works. Pretty good.

 

Still reading "Alanya to Alanya"; I've just been sidetracked with other stuff.

 

Just picked up John Robbins's new book, Healthy at 100,which looks wonderful. Just read the intro and I'm loving it already.

I bought it hoping it would also emphasize how important having love, positive relationships, and happiness in one's life is also part of total true health. I think emotional and mental health is just as important as eating correctly. Looks like he goes into it quite a bit Here is an interview with Robbins.

 

Ordered, Take This Job and Ship It!

and also, Excitotoxins, the Taste That Kills

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I just got done reading Green Living...it was really interesting but it was kinda weird when the writer was speaking of how produce is separated in the Grocery store and stated that leafy greens aren't vegetables...it was quite odd and that blurb didn't make much sense

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Just picked up John Robbins's new book, Healthy at 100,which looks wonderful. Just read the intro and I'm loving it already.

Just got mine in the mail yesterday.

I also got "Food Revolution" and "Skinny bitch"

 

I'm almost finished with "skinny bitch" and I have laughed out loud a lot when reading it. It's not a diet book though, they just want people to go vegan. They present the enzyme theory like it was a proven fact. At one point i the book they state that there is B-12 in spirulina and at an other point in the book they say that you need to take B-12 supplements since there is none in vegetable sources. It's probably confusing if you don't know. They never mention w-3/w-6 ratio. They say that sunlight will give you vitamin D, which it does if you live in Los Angeles. A vegan health/diet book shoud include info. on all these issues. But I still recommend it for the fun

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  • 2 months later...
Awesome, Offense! Great,isn't it? So far, anyway.

This would make a great book to sit down with others and discuss, don't you think? I find myself talking to myself about it

The books of Robbins, McDougall, Fuhrman, Esselstyn, Campbell, Barnard, etc are so important. They build up the obvious evidence of the consequenses of nutritional folly. I believe that in a few years people would want to discuss these issues. But for now the only ones who will listen are ourselves. I tend to agree with myself though which is a plus

 

Forgot to add that I am also reading, "Virginity or Death!" by Katha Politt...as usual, I've got too much reading going on at once!

I read the column. You got some serious issues with your religious right over there . But now that you'r bombing Iraq things will probably resolve themselves . Have you seen Borat? The christian gathering in the movie freaked me out big time...

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I just got done reading Green Living...it was really interesting but it was kinda weird when the writer was speaking of how produce is separated in the Grocery store and stated that leafy greens aren't vegetables...it was quite odd and that blurb didn't make much sense

I've seen other authors state that leafy greens should be in a category all by themselves, because of their superior nutritional content as compared to other vegetables.

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I think they shouldn't be blatantly stated as not being vegetable though...just say some vegetables are better than others...but in reality I think a pure fruit diet is more reasonable than a pure leafy green diet due to the much lower concentration of carbohydrates...I couldn't imagine eating 100% of my daily value in carbs by eating spinach and kale alone

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Just gave up on "The End of Food" by Thomas Pawlick. A few good ideas, but overall poorly written, too many copied passages. Not vegan, but does have some interesting things to say about nutrient decline in fruits and veggies.

 

Recently finished "Go Further" by Woody Harrelson - good inspiration to uh, go further with everything and not be discouraged. Haven't seen the film.

 

Right now reading, "We Tell Ourselves Stories So That We May Live" by Joan Didion. It's an anthology of all her non-fiction works since the early 60s, not vegan, health or AR, but sort of political, social commentary. She's quickly becoming one of my favourite writers - it only takes a few lines from anywhere in the book to hook you.

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"We Tell Ourselves..." sounds very provocative. I may give it a looksee when I can. Thanks for the recommendation.

 

After finishing "Healthy at 100," I give it a high recommendation with only a bit of criticism -- it is repetetive; it could be cut down by 1/3 at least. I find that annoying, but it's not enough to deserve any points subtracted.

 

Now, another *gem* is "Diseaseproof Your Child," by Dr. Joel Fuhrman --- *excellent.* I did not feel the need to even read this book because, one, I don't have children, and dont plan on having children; and, two, I'm no longer a child .

 

But, wow, it's so much more. I really wish he'd not entitled the book this way because this is a book for everyone (if you're a parent please, please get this book); and I bet most will give it a pass for thinking as I did. What a shame!

 

...Tons of info about nutrition and, of course, backed up with science and references. There is so much in there and it does also apply to adults. You can only learn from the information put forth.

 

Am now reading "Cholesterol Protection For Life." May as well plug "Eat To Live; it's one of the most important books of our time, right up there with "China Study."

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I'm in serious need of some fluff so I raided my son's bookshelf and started reading Eragon.

I've heard it's supposed to be pretty good.

Next on my list is "Buddha" by Karen Armstrong

It's a biography on the life of Siddartha Guatama (The Buddha) It tries to explore what life was really like for him.

 

( and then....... I have to whittle down that 3 foot high stack of books I haven't gotten to yet )

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Since I don't read my girlfriend purchased me a book on reading...called How To Read A Book...it sounds like a joke and it was but I'm reading it anyway. This will give me a jumpstart on literature since I plan to begin reading ASAP

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Wow, so many great books have been listed here. My "to read" list continues to grow.

 

After finishing "Healthy at 100," I give it a high recommendation with only a bit of criticism -- it is repetetive; it could be cut down by 1/3 at least. I find that annoying, but it's not enough to deserve any points subtracted.

 

I just finished "Healthy at 100" and I totally agree, raven. Long, and repetitive, but still worthy of the read.

 

I'm currently going between 2 books:

 

"The Art of Happiness, A Handbook for Living" by His Holiness The Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler, M.D. -- I'm very much enjoying this book so far. A very easy, thought provoking read.

 

and

 

"The Tibetan book of Living and Dying" by Sogyal Rinpoche -- which is heavy...intense...seems I can only read small portions at a time in order for it to sink in properly, hence the going-between-two-books-thing. This'll be one I'll have to read and re-read over the years for sure. I'm 242 pages in and I HIGHLY recommend it.

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Wow, so many great books have been listed here. My "to read" list continues to grow.

 

After finishing "Healthy at 100," I give it a high recommendation with only a bit of criticism -- it is repetetive; it could be cut down by 1/3 at least. I find that annoying, but it's not enough to deserve any points subtracted.

 

I just finished "Healthy at 100" and I totally agree, raven. Long, and repetitive, but still worthy of the read.

 

I'm currently going between 2 books:

 

"The Art of Happiness, A Handbook for Living" by His Holiness The Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler, M.D. -- I'm very much enjoying this book so far. A very easy, thought provoking read.

 

and

 

"The Tibetan book of Living and Dying" by Sogyal Rinpoche -- which is heavy...intense...seems I can only read small portions at a time in order for it to sink in properly, hence the going-between-two-books-thing. This'll be one I'll have to read and re-read over the years for sure. I'm 242 pages in and I HIGHLY recommend it.

 

 

 

I've read the Art of Happiness and enjoyed it very much.

 

The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying is another one of those books in my 3 foot pile. I'm glad to hear that it's good!

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I just finished "Healthy at 100" and I totally agree, raven. Long, and repetitive, but still worthy of the read.

 

I love that he addressed the issue of all other aspects of life being relevant. It's easy to focus on one area -- which tends to be materialism and wealth nowadays -- and that will always lead to an imbalance and/or unhappiness and feelings of un-fulfillment.

 

"The Tibetan book of Living and Dying" by Sogyal Rinpoche -- which is heavy...intense...seems I can only read small portions at a time in order for it to sink in properly, hence the going-between-two-books-thing. This'll be one I'll have to read and re-read over the years for sure. I'm 242 pages in and I HIGHLY recommend it.

 

Well, I've never heard of it, but that's no surprise . I must be really screwed up because I have the hardest time comprehending Buddhism

Last year I was at a bookstore and, out of nowhere, really, I picked up The Places That Scare You" by Pema Chodron. Had never heard of her, don't even know why I chose the book...anyway, it looked simple enough and was short , so I got it. I still can't get past the first few pages.

Saddest thing is, I know it's not *that* difficult; I just "can't" get into it for some reason. I don't retain any of what I read for some reason. I've got a serious block

I've since seen her on (PBS) television and realized she is somewhat well-known.

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I picked up The Places That Scare You" by Pema Chodron.

 

Just looked this book up on Amazon. Looks good!

 

 

A few other books I really love and thought I'd recommend:

 

Battle Royale - Koushun Takami (the back jacket says: Lord of the Flies for the 21st Century. It's a fun, albeit somewhat disturbing, page turner that really made me think about how messed up humanity is)

 

A Fortunate Life - A.B. Facey (A hard to find Australian book. Absolutely enthralling. I think I cried the whole way through)

 

Voices from Chernobyl, The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster - Svetlana Alexievich. (Without a doubt one of the most disturbing/haunting books I have ever read, and that's saying a lot because I read a lot of disturbing things)

 

Papillon - Henri Charriere (An oldie but a goodie)

 

Night - Elie Wiesel (Another oldie and a must read by everyone)

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  • 2 months later...

Recently, I just finished reading The Okinawa Program by Willcox, Willcox and Suzuki. It's a good book overall, incorporating some facts meditation, prayers and other health tips.

 

The Pleasure Trap by Lisle and Goldhamer. Good book, but it only touches superficially the aspects that drugs and other stimulants have on our health.

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