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high reps and hypertrophy


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Hey, quick question: is it true that high rep sets don't stimulate the production of testosterone or growth hormone and, as a result, don't promote hypertrophy?

 

I'm on a cycle now where I do two weeks focused solely on 15 rep sets w/30 seconds rest between sets, two weeks with 10 reps and 60 seconds rest, then two weeks at 5 reps w/90 seconds rest. All are exhausting in their own way, but am I wasting time with the 15 rep sets?

 

Apologies if this was already covered, I couldn't find a similar topic in the search engine.

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Hello mate...

 

In my experience I've found high reps / longer time under tension can be quite productive for stimulating growth, especially were my legs are concerned. If your goal is to optimize your muscular development, then the weight is of second importance, growth is stimulated by fatiguing the muscles.

 

In this interview, leading researcher in the field of exercise physiology Dr Wayne Westcott talks about rep ranges...

http://www.highintensitynation.com/2011/10/high-intensity-training-interview-of-the-month-dr-wayne-westcott/

 

Best

Rob

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what do you guys see as high reps? to me its above 20, just wondering if it is the same for you guys?

 

I tend to do sets of 12-15 with mid-heavy weights. I go higher when using light weights, maybe 30, but that is pretty rare, and then it is more about working to failure.

 

I always thought that lower rep training (w/ heavy weights) was in the 6-10 rep range? I guess it could be different for everyone.

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what do you guys see as high reps? to me its above 20, just wondering if it is the same for you guys?

 

 

Hi Mike,

 

For me, i tend to use a weight that allows me to still stay within an anaerobic pathway, that's means no more than 60-70 seconds of time under tension, so for example, if i was taking 3-4 seconds to complete a rep, then your talking anywhere between 15-20+. As far as an exact rep number goes, i don't have one, just whatever rep i hit failure on.

 

Best

Rob

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i think thats what i kinda do at the moment Rob, gives a better pump too! im trying to stop worrying about numbers and just go for feeling nowadays.............lighter weights higher reps has gotta be better for joints tendons and so on also

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i think thats what i kinda do at the moment Rob, gives a better pump too! im trying to stop worrying about numbers and just go for feeling nowadays.............lighter weights higher reps has gotta be better for joints tendons and so on also

 

 

That's it mate, as long as you still staying within an anaerobic pathway your good ta go. Are high reps better for the joints / connective tissues? There is unfortunately a wear and tear / damage element here too.

Edited by HIT Rob
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Hey rob, do you go to failure each set? I always told to avoid going to failure.. But am willing to give it a try

 

Hey Ross

 

I've had a lot of debates over this one lol

 

This is what i believe...

 

The stimulus needs to be of a sufficient magnitude to warrant an adaptive response. You literately need to threaten your own physiology, and in my opinion, performing 4,5,6 or even 10 sets to only a certain point with the same weight and for an arbitrary number of reps just doesn't cut the mustard! I've (and anyone i've ever trained) always found training to failure to be the most productive and efficient way to train.

 

Listen to how Mike Mentzer explain's it at the start of this

 

When training to positive failure, and as you grow stronger, one MUST properly manage the stress (yes you can train to failure and manage stress), and one MUST regulated their volume and frequency accordingly, if you don't....your progress will come to a grinding halt.

 

Best

Rob

Edited by HIT Rob
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No worries mate, as Mike Mentzer told me "i don't have exhaustive knowledge, but am certain about what am certain about" lol

 

Build up to just one set to failure per movement, and unsure and maintain strict form, though i probably don't need to tell ya that:)

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  • 3 months later...
Hello,

In fact High reps are superior for hypertrophy. And Low reps are for muscle. Thank you.

Isn't hypertrophy muscle? Don't quite get what you mean

 

That aside, it's still a very blanket statement. Everybody is different, and while certain theories hold true for the most part it definitely isn't a given. I managed to gain a lot of muscle on relatively low rep training (as opposed to your typical 8-12 rep bodybuilding-type-hypertrophy rep ranges), so for me I wouldn't exclusively increase my reps if hypertrophy was my primary goal.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

According to eric Helms from 3DMJ whom I strongly agree with on this point the only thing that really matter is total work load. So someone doing 5x5 @ 120 ibs is doing a total tonage of 3000 ibs. someone doing 3x10 at only 100 ibs is also totaling 3000 ibs of tonage so they are going to get the same over all muscular development. There may be other benefits in terms of sports specific training to doing one or the other, but if you're only goal is muscular development then it really is't making a difference.

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Actually, after rereading what I said, I only partially agree with myself. The way i applied it was relevant, but it almost sounds like you could infinitely keep doing more sets and still continue to get better results with the more sets by increasing work load and I don't think that is accurate either.

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