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You can now add Turkey to the list of countries to boycott


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My parents were born and raised in Turkey. While it has always been known that animal welfare is non-existent there, this takes the cake. Please read and inform yourself of what the despicable Turkish govnt is allowing to happen, and PLEASE take a moment to fire off an email to the govnt officials noted below and express both your disdain and your intention to BOYCOTT Turkey on your next European or Middle eastern vacation:

 

PETA has obtained undercover video footage showing horrible cruelty to beautiful horses at Turkey's government-run Refik Saydam Hygiene Center (RSHC). The video captures shocking images of struggling horses who are violently dragged to the ground with ropes so that their necks can be slashed with a scalpel while they are completely conscious. Workers bind the horses' legs closely to their bodies for restraint and sit on top of the struggling animals to hold them down. Moans of agony and shudders of pain reveal the horses to be fully conscious during the procedure, which sometimes lasts for hours. The horses are left to bleed to death and their bloodied bodies are dragged outside and dumped on the side of the street.

 

 

This horse's legs are tightly bound with rope.

In the United States and Europe, blood is collected from horses just as it's collected from human beings: An intravenous needle is inserted through the skin and into a vein. Horses stand comfortably in a stall during the procedure, and several liters of blood are collected without harming or killing the horses. Anyone who has given blood knows that the experience can be distressing, but it is nothing compared to the anguish experienced by the horses at the RSHC. The video reveals RSHC technicians who cannot or will not make a proper needle insertion and who instead slash the horses' necks in order to expose the jugular vein. There is no excuse for this shoddy and cruel technique. PETA has written to RSHC officials to inform them that this horrific cruelty to horses for serum production will not be tolerated.

 

The RSHC produces horse serum for the government as a cheap but dangerous substitute for human serum in medical products. The United States long ago used horse serum for rabies shots and other antitoxins until it was discovered that horse antibodies lead to a dangerous condition called "serum sickness" in 16 percent of patients. Today, horse blood is increasingly unnecessary for medical use in the U.S., but when it is needed, obtaining it looks nothing like this house of horrors run by the Turkish government.

 

What You Can Do

1. Write to RSHC President Dr. Turan Aslan and ask him to stop these cruel procedures immediately:

 

Turan Aslan, M.D., President

Refik Saydam Hygiene Center

Cemal Gursel Caddesi, No. 18

06100 Sihhiye, Ankara

Turkey

[email protected]

 

2. Write to Ahmet Necdet Sezer, the president of Turkey, and tell him that the Turkish government is failing to meet European animal protection standards:

 

His Excellency Ahmet Necdet Sezer

President of the Turkish Republic

Cankaya Kosku

Sehit Ersan Caddesi, No. 14

Çankaya, Ankara

Turkey

[email protected]

 

3. Please make an urgent donation to support our work for horses and other animals suffering in Turkey and around the world.

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Every country engages in animal abuse and exploitation to a greater or lesser extent. Some countries are more notorious than others. We could find reasons to boycott every country.

 

Nat - I don't believe boycotts are the best solution. It is precisely because tourists/outsiders have witnessed shocking animal cruelty that things actually change - i.e bear beating has been greatly reduced in Greece and Turkey because of outrage from tourists.

 

Many tourists are so moved by the horrors they see that they set up regional animal charities and shelters, improving the lot of some of the unfortunate animals in these countries.

 

If no-one visited other countries, they would be free to continue their 'traditional practices' in peace away from the eyes of visitors as they have done for centuries.

 

In sum, I believe more is achieved by travelling freely and highlighting and publicising animal abuse, and - when and where safe to do so - pointing this out in a tactful manner to the locals of the area you are visitin.

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Every country engages in animal abuse and exploitation to a greater or lesser extent. Some countries are more notorious than others. We could find reasons to boycott every country.

 

Nat - I don't believe boycotts are the best solution. It is precisely because tourists/outsiders have witnessed shocking animal cruelty that things actually change - i.e bear beating has been greatly reduced in Greece and Turkey because of outrage from tourists.

 

Many tourists are so moved by the horrors they see that they set up regional animal charities and shelters, improving the lot of some of the unfortunate animals in these countries.

 

If no-one visited other countries, they would be free to continue their 'traditional practices' in peace away from the eyes of visitors as they have done for centuries.

 

In sum, I believe more is achieved by travelling freely and highlighting and publicising animal abuse, and - when and where safe to do so - pointing this out in a tactful manner to the locals of the area you are visitin.

 

Good points Matt. Very good points. But the boycott denies these countries income from tourism, and money counts.

 

So I can see both sides of this. AND furthermore a boycott of any country is more effective if you actualy both telling the country's govnt that you are boycotting them and your reasons for doing so.

 

But yes, it is so hard to know what the best course of action is to effect changes in foreign govnts' animal policies . I think we need both.

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I don't think boycotting countries is effective.

First of all, environmental and animal advocate groups are more common in richer countries (we have time and fewer things to worry about).

Second, democracy is still in progress in Turkey. To get politicians to listen to the animal advocates more and better democracy should be implemented.

Boycotting animal products from Turkey would be better since it would send signals to the government that something is wrong with their politics. Not buying fruit from Turkey won't help the animals.

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ya im with that fruit comment. i see boycott lists which canada is on, and i think to myself, how is boycotting everything from here gonna save the seals??? you have to change the demand of the seal products not by boycotting our maple syrup

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ya im with that fruit comment. i see boycott lists which canada is on, and i think to myself, how is boycotting everything from here gonna save the seals??? you have to change the demand of the seal products not by boycotting our maple syrup

I've never eaten maple syrup in my entire life . Sonds icky . I mean trees are nice and all but .

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From what I understand Turkey is trying to get membership into the European Union, so now would be a good time to bring to their attention that this animal abuse is not acceptable and does not coincide with European anti-cruelty laws.

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The sad thing about Turkey though is that it is not being allowed into the EU because the Turkish government will not protect basic HUMAN rights so forget about animal rights in that country. There is a saying about Turkish prisons being worse than Mexican prisons. Basically, you go to jail in Turkey, you may never come out alive. Add to that the constant conflicts with the Kurds...no wonder the EU won't let them in. I imagine the EU could care less about the horses. I hate to diss on France because I love that place but look at the stuff they eat. Fois gras! They forcefeed a goose until it dies a painful death so they can eat one organ from it but they are going to deny Turkish entry into EU because they slash horse throats? Naw, not likely.

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It has been and is a major stumbling block, but Turkey seems to be open to re-defining certain things to fit within EU standards. We'll just have to wait and see. In the meantime, it can't hurt to bring anything to the EU's attention since this seems to be something Turkey is getting serious about.

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omg and why would i wanna watch that?

 

yeah, I hear ya endcruelty.

It's tough to handle. Every now and then I force myself to watch these clips but if you already know what is happening out there, it would drive you nuts! So disturbing & depressing!!!!

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i just finished downloading it and i skip around just to see what its about.....and i really dont know how i'll be able to watch 90mins of this ive seen video after video but this is just over the top...... i hope its legal to burn this movie and tell others to dl it because if so im gonna promote this dl till im blue in the face

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omg the very end there was this little bird with a leather stuck to his tail and he kept going around in circles to get it off but couldnt.....then you see another little bird fly in and take the leather off the tail...... omg chills.....i love this movie everybody watch it and spread it...... there is alot of terrible images but i still think everyone should see this 1

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From what I understand Turkey is trying to get membership into the European Union, so now would be a good time to bring to their attention that this animal abuse is not acceptable and does not coincide with European anti-cruelty laws.

 

But Crash, of course no animal abuse or cruelty occurs in the EU.

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From what I understand Turkey is trying to get membership into the European Union, so now would be a good time to bring to their attention that this animal abuse is not acceptable and does not coincide with European anti-cruelty laws.

 

But Crash, of course no animal abuse or cruelty occurs in the EU.

Ok, maybe I should have said, "now would be a good time to get them to improve their animal abuse and anti-cruelty laws." ( smart-:bootyshake: )

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