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Is Robert really Vegan? Maybe Not.


karlhubris
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I looked at the grocer today and saw their grapefruit had the same beeswax warning on it...it wasn't organic and they didn't have any organic ones to pic from. The oranges didn't say anything at all.

As for the cliff bars I think your the only one...nothing that small does anything but make me more hungry...I've gotta eat 3-4 of them to feel anything in there...one will give me energy but it does nothin for the tummy. That may come from having such a big tummy for so long though. Once I was really bored and I ate 10 peanut butter crunch cliff bars dipped in peanut butter. I didn't know how many I ate until my peanut butter was gone...then I freaked out and counted the wrappers in the trash...very stupid to do on a diet! I think that was about 3500 calories in a very short time(maybe an hour) on a diet thats not supposed to exceed much over 3000 for the whole day at most.

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man potter so many bars in peanutbutter would be great. And fib the oranges I bought were not organic, I looked at some organic ones today and saw nothing about wax, infact i dont think organic oranges would have anything on them. I also dont buy organic fruit that has a peel since it costs more and I dont think I limit my intake of chemicals all that much, but if only organic oranges do not have the wax on them i'll buy them organic as well. This makes me wonder about buying orange juice and even canned oranges (if there is such a thing). Anyone know when wax is put on oranges?

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I know what you're saying. The vegan police have succeeded in convincing me that I am officially anti-vegan. I used to call myself vegan, but I don't anymore just because dealing with the vegan police is too much of a pain. I'm now a "plant-based dieter"

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I'm assuming its put on right away if its going to go to the market...if its gonna be juiced I don't see why they'd waste the money. I guess it just helps keep oxygen from getting to the fruit...organic foods are supposed to go bad quick...it reasures the buyer they're getting what they paid for...I've had some cheap veggies stay fresh forever...makes me wonder what the hell was on them...go to ebay collegeb...thats where I got all mine

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Sometimes I get foods that go bad so quick I almost think they keep them in the back until they're almost not good to sell...then they sell them and want you to come back quick because you throw it away...its happened at Trader Joe's and Whole Foods...I've bought produce and its gone bad in a few days....I even bought bread once that had mold on it the next day when I tried to finish it.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I am fully aware of that...you are missing the context...to some vegan police that is a no-no! Obviously even Robert said he had a bit of a problem with that. The point was this, one more time...we all weigh our risks/reward...I think for most of us that is an acceptable risk. I could get on my high horse and say " that means your supporting someone who supports the dairy industry!...heretic!!" I think its a pretty simple concept.

Buying a vegan product that is made in the same factory in which dairy-containing products are made is not supporting the dairy industry. None of the money for the vegan product is going towards the dairy because the dairy is unrelated to the vegan product and often to the company that makes the vegan product.

 

Like someone else said, it's like cooking vegan food in a kitchen that is not vegan. It would be like when I go to my parents--I eat vegan there, but they have meat and eggs and dairy there and there may be traces of non-vegan on the stuff in their kitchen. I would not consider my food non-vegan just because I prepared it in their kitchen. I certainly would not think that by eating my vegan stuff that I made in their kitchen, I was supporting the dairy industry.

 

Yeah, some super-strict vegans would not eat anything that "may contain traces of dairy" but that would have more to do with personal purity than with supporting the dairy industry.

 

But if you go out and buy a product that actually contains dairy as one of its ingredients, then that is supporting the dairy industry.

 

I don't think that eating something non-vegan automatically causes one to no longer be a vegan. I'd call most vegans who make a slip now and then vegans who make a slip. I'm sure tons of us make slips now and then, of varying degrees. But intent matters. If a person intends to be vegan, but slips up, I'd still consider the person vegan. But if the person intends to eat nearly vegan, but always has the intention to allow him/herself to eat X non-vegan thing, then I would not call that person vegan.

Well said. Agree 100%.

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