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Dumbbell bench press hurt shoulders?


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I have been having problem with my shoulders: pain, sore to touch at end of collar bone, etc. First my right and now my left. The right, has been sore, to varying degree for two months.

 

Do you think dumbbells could cause problem? For last six months, I have been exclusively using dumbbells. I was thinking they might be putting a lot of pressure on my shoulders, since heavy weight isolated to each arm, versus both arms balancing the weight as with a barbell.

 

For example, I hold the dumbbells, to do bench press, as I sit on the bench and lay back to lie on the bench. As a fall back slowly on the bench, I am holding the dumbbells with each hand. Even going slow, that might shock my shoulders after I hit the bench with my back. Also when I initially lift them into position to do bench press, I can feel pressure on my shoulders.

 

Anyone work with dumbbells a lot? Is this likely a problem caused by them?

 

Note: I do do rotator cuff exercises, so they should not be out of shape.

 

Thanks.

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I hurt my right shoulder christmas 2003 doing dumbell bench. I took about 18months to heal to the point where it didn't ache for most of the time. I still feel it now and again. It doesn't mean that it's a bad exercise, I just think that there is less injury risk with the barbell

 

Jonathan

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I think its different for everyone...I have a terrible left shoulder but both shoulders have always been flexible and the dumbell presses felt much better than the straight bar...it let my shoulder do what it wanted in terms of going back and rotating...the straight bar didn't do that so it gave me problems. This is why I'd only do decline bench with a bar and I'd do flat bench with a bar maybe 3 days every two months(those three days would be in the same week to get reaclimated for bench maxing)

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I actually find dumbbells better than barbells, because they don't lock you into a particular path of motion, and allow you to follow the path that best suits your shoulders, like holding the weights with palms facing each other, or at a 45=degree angle.

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I actually find dumbbells better than barbells, because they don't lock you into a particular path of motion, and allow you to follow the path that best suits your shoulders, like holding the weights with palms facing each other, or at a 45=degree angle.

 

I wonder if this (free path) might be the cause to my problem though. It might be putting too much pressure on stabilizer muscles to balance the weight properly and inflaming their tendons.

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Did you use the same weight all the time? Maybe it's just too much weight instead of the form of the weight. Just a thought.

 

If that was to me, I hurt my shoulder at wrestling practice, not lifting. Form is not an issue.

I had to wait about a month to start lifting again, for the inflammation and soreness to go down enough, so Ive lost a lot of strength.

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If that was to me ...

I wrote the comment in a rush, I totally forgot to address it. The comment was actually for 9nines, but that doesn't make your statment less interesting

Sorry though!

 

It is interesting, that you train with dumbbells after your injury now and that it helps you. I for myself haven't had any problems with dumbbells either. I also like the freedom of my arms during the workout. I also use barbells, but I find dumbbells very important since I think it is essential to also train the muscles that stabilize your movements, because that is what keeps you up right and "functioning" in daily life.

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If straight bars don't bother you I don't see anything wrong with them but there's nothing bad about dumbells at all and I personally think it makes you much stronger.

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Most of my weight training is with dumbbells and I haven't had any injuries. When I'm doing db benches, I sit on the bench, rest the dbs on my thighs, then lay down, pull the dbs into position and start repping

 

Not to sound like an egotistical shit, but it's pretty hard to do that comfortably when the dumbells get heavier. Best to have someone to help you get them into place

 

Jonathan

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I sit(sat them...its been a while) them upright on my thights(we had rubber dumbells) and rolled my body back with my knees bent...keeping the dumbells on my thighs then they dumbells were in perfect position...I was doing that with 125lbs dumbells...did the opposite put them down do I didn't hurt my shoulder dropping them

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Most of my weight training is with dumbbells and I haven't had any injuries. When I'm doing db benches, I sit on the bench, rest the dbs on my thighs, then lay down, pull the dbs into position and start repping

 

Not to sound like an egotistical shit, but it's pretty hard to do that comfortably when the dumbells get heavier. Best to have someone to help you get them into place

 

Jonathan

 

Nah, you just sound like you have weak thighs

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I use 80 lbs in each hand for bench lately and have no problems resting it on my thighs while laying back. If you do get soreness though, you can fold a towel over your legs and problem solved. My philosophy is that if you need someone to help you get the weights up, then you're doing too much weight. Lighten the load so you can have good form independently of a spotter and do more reps.

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Fair enough

 

I have used 110's but that is never comfortable for me - alot of shoulder straining.

 

Jonathan

 

I am not doing that much wait (around 70 pounds each dumbbell is my maximum, around 60 to 65 is my normal work-out now) but it seems like a lot of pressure on my shoulders too, as I position them.

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Revisiting this question: I wonder if the dumbbells are causing you to use too great a range of motion, and go beyond having your elbows level with the bench (which offers more risk than benefit, IMO). You can check to see what your ideal ROM should be by doing these lying on the floor (use lighter weights if necessary, this is just a test of ROM, not an actual workout if you don't want it to be). The floor itself will keep you from going down too low, and will teach you the safer ROM.

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Revisiting this question: I wonder if the dumbbells are causing you to use too great a range of motion, and go beyond having your elbows level with the bench (which offers more risk than benefit, IMO). You can check to see what your ideal ROM should be by doing these lying on the floor (use lighter weights if necessary, this is just a test of ROM, not an actual workout if you don't want it to be). The floor itself will keep you from going down too low, and will teach you the safer ROM.

 

This might be - I do go past that. Thanks.

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Being bad only gets you so big...if you train to a point to get the largest a human can get clean its likely nowhere close to that size...then if you train harder than that you just shrink.

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