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budget veganism


dandylioness
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I have the advantage of having good vegan food in my college cafateria now but I make food at home...if I was in a dorm I'd take a bunch of zip lock bags(I did this when I first turned vegan but the vegan options were lacking) and take food. It's like $5 a meal but you can eat $5 worth and take $10 to go...here we have a fridge full of rice and soy and I know tons of people that take 1/2 every time they go...as for food in your dorm...if you have a fridge I recommend loading up on tons of veggies soy dogs, and eat tons of PBJ(do it while your young)

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Rice, beans (both dry), I also recommend frozen veggies. Tofu. Unsalted peanuts, peanut butter, almonds. tortilla chips, salsa. And buy some spices. Also have garlic around. Bragg's liquid aminos. Spike vegit seasonings. Maybe some canned goods. Keep around some stuff you like to eat raw as well. And if you like the protein powders keep those stocked. This is all the stuff I ate when I was in the dorms, and pretty much what I still eat. If you have an oven get some whole wheat flour, turbinado sugar....you know stuff for baking. Olive oil is a great suggestion too.

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As others have said: beans, rice, oatmeal.

And find a coop if you can, where you can buy these staples in bulk: the cheapest way to get them. (You could even volunteer to work a few hours a week for a workers discount...unless all of ' those' kind of coops are dead and gone these days!)

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How do you make dry beans in a microwave? Or do you just sprout em?

 

I usually rinse canned beans now too because they're ultra salty.

 

When I was in the dorm I'd soak beans for 24hrs...overnight isn't quite enough...then depending on the bean you can cook them in 20 minutes or so...I let them boil...shut it off...then let it cool a bit then boil again

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How do you make dry beans in a microwave? Or do you just sprout em?

 

I usually rinse canned beans now too because they're ultra salty.

 

When I was in the dorm I'd soak beans for 24hrs...overnight isn't quite enough...then depending on the bean you can cook them in 20 minutes or so...I let them boil...shut it off...then let it cool a bit then boil again

 

 

I have to get a ton of dried beans from the store(probably tommorow after hell day, aka wednesday).

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A tip on beans: after you soak the beans, pour off the soak water (which contains many of the fart-producing elements--that's the technical term ), then add fresh water and cook. You can also add a bit of kombu seaweed to the cooking water to make them more digestible.

 

Lentils don't need soaking, and cook in about 20-30 minutes.

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I have been wondering how you get beans to sprout

 

First, get good dried beans with no chips or cracks in them.

Then, soak overnight and rinse well.

Then, the best method is the bag method (some beans, like garbanzos, are a bit tricky, because they can mold quickly, so the ventilation of the bag helps), rinsing 2-3 times a day (more in hot weather, less in cooler weather). They are ready when there's a little sprout on them, maybe 3 days or so.

 

Several sprout experts don't recommend eating many sprouted beans raw, as they are hard to digest (especially the larger beans), but gently steaming them. Of course, that's not raw, but it takes less time than cooking, and the sprouted beans have more nutrients than unsprouted beans, and less are destroyed by quick steaming than by long cooking and boiling.

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Never thought about the water thing and the beans...I always saved it because I thought it made a better broth...maybe it does but it just has terrible consequences

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Spice up beans and brown rice with lots of extra virgin olive oil (or other oil, but even EVOO is cheap if you buy it in the big metal cans), fresh green peppers, mushrooms, hot sauce, cayenne pepper, curry powder or its component spices such as corriander, cumin, turmeric, and other things I can't remember (though probably not all these spices at once . When I started doing this, rice and beans started becoming awesome, and totally filling.

 

And find good beans too, try different brands/varieties.

 

Also, a good skillet is essential, I prefer cast Iron... This is making me hungry...

 

-Joel

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All the same suggestions from me, I've got the budget thing going on too. Beans, rice, brocolli fresh and frozen, frozen berries, bananas, bags of apples are pretty cheap, definately invest in spices. Cans of tomatoes. Peanut butter, nuts, some soy or rice milk. I don't really mess with the processed soy stuff very often, too expensive and too processed for me. But you can usually find cheap homemade tofu at asian markets. Look for that as well.

 

I just bought the students go vegan cookbook and she seems to have some pretty go suggestion in there as wel. If you get a chance check it out.

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