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Vegan and non-vegan athletes.. differences..


andgbr
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Ok, we all know that obvious differences between these two, but can anyone tell me more differences? sorry, i wish i could be more specific, but it's hard for me to put in words the question i have in mind.

 

If the quality of the muscle is better, or if we take longer or less time to build muscle, and so on.. characteristics... besides those things we already know.

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sorry my lack of explanation, i just wanted to know if besides the fat that is usually lower, and the time to recover and other ''basic'' differences, is there any other, like muscle quality, or size? or perhaps the time that we take to grow muscles when vegan comparing to a non-vegan athlete.. is there any website telling those facts..

just wanted to know.

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oh.. c'mon guys, is that a taboo or am i the only one here with time to say things around here? xD

 

Taboo???....what's all that about?

 

I know some darn skinny meat eaters and some darn overweight vegans so I don't think your question is as cut and dry as the differences between vegans and non-vegan athletes......

 

I think that it's all down to how an individual chooses to eat/train....

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sorry my lack of explanation, i just wanted to know if besides the fat that is usually lower, and the time to recover and other ''basic'' differences, is there any other, like muscle quality, or size? or perhaps the time that we take to grow muscles when vegan comparing to a non-vegan athlete.. is there any website telling those facts..

just wanted to know.

 

No need to apologize. Why do you think the recovery time is longer? I don't know of any website that has clear answers to your questions.. To be honest the only difference I can think of right now between vegan athletes and non-vegan athletes is the lack of creatine in the vegan diet. But you can also supplement creatine. Also a vegan needs to more actively eat protein rich foods. But again you could supplement. I don't think there's a difference in quality of the muscle. As for size, I really don't know.

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oh.. c'mon guys, is that a taboo or am i the only one here with time to say things around here? xD

 

Taboo???....what's all that about?

 

I know some darn skinny meat eaters and some darn overweight vegans so I don't think your question is as cut and dry as the differences between vegans and non-vegan athletes......

 

I think that it's all down to how an individual chooses to eat/train....

 

based on the average.. we could assume certain characteristics for each diet, not to show how better one is or worst, but just to give an idea, if you know what I'm saying.

 

sorry my lack of explanation, i just wanted to know if besides the fat that is usually lower, and the time to recover and other ''basic'' differences, is there any other, like muscle quality, or size? or perhaps the time that we take to grow muscles when vegan comparing to a non-vegan athlete.. is there any website telling those facts..

just wanted to know.

 

No need to apologize. Why do you think the recovery time is longer? I don't know of any website that has clear answers to your questions.. To be honest the only difference I can think of right now between vegan athletes and non-vegan athletes is the lack of creatine in the vegan diet. But you can also supplement creatine. Also a vegan needs to more actively eat protein rich foods. But again you could supplement. I don't think there's a difference in quality of the muscle. As for size, I really don't know.

 

i never said such thing, i was asking, not confirming. =)

what's creatine for?

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You can get all the nutrients you need from either a vegan or from a meat-eating diet. Whether you are classified as vegan or non-vegan shouldn't have any effect on your muscle quality - only whether you get all your nutrients in the right amount or not.

 

Creatine allows your cells to hold more water so you can gain weight more easily. It some cases it slightly increases the amount of weight you can lift.

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There is no difference in the quality of muscle. Generally speaking it takes the same amount of time to build muscle. To recuperate fast the best thing you can do is eat two blueberry and banana smoothies a day.... which is not a vegan issue.

 

If you aren't malnourishing yourself then the biggest difference is you ought to be less likely to catch a cold or flu as a vegan. That could mean less interruptions in training.

 

If you want to say that vegans generally get less protein that means they won't get the 10% or less non-cumulative protein stuffing effect. Eh, I need to buy a web page to explain these things as I get tired of repeating myself.

 

If you stuff yourself full of protein you'll get a boost in strenght (and muscle size) of 0 to 10% depending on the muscle and your genetics. This effect though isn't cumulative. As soon as you quit the stuffing, you'll end up right where you would have been if you had never bothered in the first place. I suppose if you're eating a "convenient" vegan diet you might get less protein and so this effect would then take place. IOW, you'd get slightly weaker.

 

Being vegan doesn't mean even in general terms that you'll be fatter or skinnier. Most likely you'll be about the same as you would have been otherwise except with less toxins stuck in your body. Vegans are generally skinnier because tons of people believe the myths about vegans being weak and thus mostly people who don't care at all about being strong (and thus usually are weak) become vegan. This is in effect just a meaningless biased sample.

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There is no difference in the quality of muscle. Generally speaking it takes the same amount of time to build muscle. To recuperate fast the best thing you can do is eat two blueberry and banana smoothies a day.... which is not a vegan issue.

 

If you aren't malnourishing yourself then the biggest difference is you ought to be less likely to catch a cold or flu as a vegan. That could mean less interruptions in training.

 

If you want to say that vegans generally get less protein that means they won't get the 10% or less non-cumulative protein stuffing effect. Eh, I need to buy a web page to explain these things as I get tired of repeating myself.

 

If you stuff yourself full of protein you'll get a boost in strenght (and muscle size) of 0 to 10% depending on the muscle and your genetics. This effect though isn't cumulative. As soon as you quit the stuffing, you'll end up right where you would have been if you had never bothered in the first place. I suppose if you're eating a "convenient" vegan diet you might get less protein and so this effect would then take place. IOW, you'd get slightly weaker.

 

Being vegan doesn't mean even in general terms that you'll be fatter or skinnier. Most likely you'll be about the same as you would have been otherwise except with less toxins stuck in your body. Vegans are generally skinnier because tons of people believe the myths about vegans being weak and thus mostly people who don't care at all about being strong (and thus usually are weak) become vegan. This is in effect just a meaningless biased sample.

 

thanks for explaining what creatine is for me.

 

i agree that, most of vegans not being interested in building muscles.. that's true.. and I'm vegan by the way.. not a real athlete comparing to most of people here, but in regular-runner shape ( to avoid insulting myself ).

well, thanks everybody for helping me with my answers.. i really look forward for a better health and a better image for my veganism.

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thanks for explaining what creatine is for me.

 

i agree that, most of vegans not being interested in building muscles.. that's true.. and I'm vegan by the way.. not a real athlete comparing to most of people here, but in regular-runner shape ( to avoid insulting myself ).

well, thanks everybody for helping me with my answers.. i really look forward for a better health and a better image for my veganism.

Creatine is a ....molecular "thing" ... I guess which is most highly prevalent in red meat although in much smaller quantities it's in vegetables also. I think beets have it? It seems to help muscles soak up more water which on average makes the muscle stronger and larger. It's also non-cumulative in within a few weeks of using it you can make as much improvement as if you had used it straight for a year. (And when you quit using it, you lose whatever little you gained while using it.)

 

I could gain 5% or so more strength while taking creatine depending on the muscle. And there are creatine (vegan) supplements. It's normally made in a lab so all creatine supplements are more or less vegan. Unless someone wants to get nitpicky about whatever else (animal testing, etc) that company is doing.

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the difference between one meat-eater and another meat-eater can be just as drastic as a meat-eater and a vegan. Vegans as a group, I don't believe there is an astounding difference from non-vegans in terms of bodybuilding necessarily.

 

If you take a 'healthy' non-vegan and examine their diet, you'll find that it's probably going to contain a very high percentage of vegan foods, green vegetables, fruits etc. The differences between a healthy vegan diet and a healthy non-vegan diet won't be that much at all, as far as I am concerned, depending on what 'healthy' means.

 

Many bodybuilders aren't what I'd consider to be healthy, their diets are probably going to do them long-term damage.

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Many bodybuilders aren't what I'd consider to be healthy, their diets are probably going to do them long-term damage.

 

I agree to an extent, for meat eaters anyway. I think high calorie diets may not be truly optimal, but I think if you base your diet on fruits and vegetables like a lot of people on here, you can do fine.

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Many bodybuilders aren't what I'd consider to be healthy, their diets are probably going to do them long-term damage.

 

I agree to an extent, for meat eaters anyway. I think high calorie diets may not be truly optimal, but I think if you base your diet on fruits and vegetables like a lot of people on here, you can do fine.

 

Yeah, you can be a bodybuilder and be healthy. I think some of the aims of larger bodybuilders are at odds with what is healthy, they will achieve the aesthetic look they are going for, but that's not necessarily going to be healthy. Bodybuilding in itself isn't unhealthy, and this board is full of healthy bodybuilders.

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Many bodybuilders aren't what I'd consider to be healthy, their diets are probably going to do them long-term damage.

 

I agree to an extent, for meat eaters anyway. I think high calorie diets may not be truly optimal, but I think if you base your diet on fruits and vegetables like a lot of people on here, you can do fine.

 

Yeah, you can be a bodybuilder and be healthy. I think some of the aims of larger bodybuilders are at odds with what is healthy, they will achieve the aesthetic look they are going for, but that's not necessarily going to be healthy. Bodybuilding in itself isn't unhealthy, and this board is full of healthy bodybuilders.

 

With the size some of the largers ones go for, I sometimes don't think they're mentally healthy either.

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