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No bananas and carrots?


andesuma
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So, I've been studying a lot about Living Nutrition lately..

which I believe, means you leave out starchy things, such as .. carrots

and bananas.

But I haven't found any reasons as to why.

 

(In an interview I read, Juliano states he doesn't consume these

because they are "disacorides")

 

Soo...I'd love some more input on this subject, if anyone is familiar

with it..

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Hard to believe carrots could cause any harm. Go check in your Norman Walker books, he talks some about starch. Might help. Other than that, no clue.

 

 

Well..I do know that root veggies are 'supposedly' poorer nutritionally

speaking, at least, in comparison to their green(stems).

And I do notice, since I went thru that fruitarian spurt, I don't ever

want/crave carrots/starches anymore, I grew up loving (raw)carrots...

so, it's really strange for me to not be consuming a bag or two of them

a day now.

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they say that because half the raw community is horribly terrified of fruit and sugar, and the higher glycemic load foods - but they consume a diet of 60-80% calories from fat, mixing that with high sugar foods causes havoc, candida, etc.

 

two choices in going raw, go high fat, low/no carb... or high carb, low fat...

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So, I've been studying a lot about Living Nutrition lately..

which I believe, means you leave out starchy things, such as .. carrots

and bananas.

But I haven't found any reasons as to why.

 

(In an interview I read, Juliano states he doesn't consume these

because they are "disacorides")

 

Soo...I'd love some more input on this subject, if anyone is familiar

with it..

 

I've heard things about carrots not having as much nutrition/harder to digest (like most root vegetables) in the human stomach, but I've never heard any reason to leave out banana's (on the basis that it's a starch), I'd be interested to read why someone thinks that.

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I remember a member of the forum saying a while back that raw root vegetables (carrots & potatoes) made him fat, so I can see why to avoid carrots (Though I'm not sure that's the case with everyone), but the starch in banana's becomes sugar as it ripens (or something like that).

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  • 3 weeks later...

I wouldn't depend on brighter colored foods to be better...I'm sure there are bright colored poisonous berries, fruits and vegetables in nature, too.

 

As for carrots and bananas, I vote yes!! The only hang-up I could see with either is in certain food combinations. For example, from what I have read, bananas go only with other fruit. And then carrots can be hard to digest and break down. I love them both!!! Yummy, nutritious, and convenient....that's like raw foodie gold right there!

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I've heard the same thing about root vegetables and their greens having much more nutritional content which is a fact but I don't think that really proves that carrots are bad...just not as good as what's up top. As for bananas I feel like total crap when I don't have atleast 4 a day and couldn't imagine the starch being all that bad especially since I eat my bananas pretty green...meaning they have more starch than ripe ones

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Carrot juice IS great but I always feel kind of wasteful about juicing them and dumping the pulp. Is it worth finding a recipe to use the carrot pulp or have most of the nutrients already been squeezed out into the juice anyway?

 

And if not, does anyone have any raw recipes for the pulp? The ones I have found so far are for cooked recipes, soups and bread and stuff.

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Carrot juice IS great but I always feel kind of wasteful about juicing them and dumping the pulp. Is it worth finding a recipe to use the carrot pulp or have most of the nutrients already been squeezed out into the juice anyway?

 

And if not, does anyone have any raw recipes for the pulp? The ones I have found so far are for cooked recipes, soups and bread and stuff.

 

The pulp makes great compost for your garden/plants!

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Carrot juice IS great but I always feel kind of wasteful about juicing them and dumping the pulp. Is it worth finding a recipe to use the carrot pulp or have most of the nutrients already been squeezed out into the juice anyway?

 

And if not, does anyone have any raw recipes for the pulp? The ones I have found so far are for cooked recipes, soups and bread and stuff.

 

I know Victoria Boutenko has a recipe for live gardenburgers,

the main ingredient being carrot pulp.

 

I believe the recipe is in "12 steps to Raw".

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If your not raw and just want juice you can use the pulp for carrot cake...or throw in in a dressing(that of course could be raw)

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carrot pulp is a great 'volumizer' for many raw recipies, sweet, and savory...

 

here's something-

 

"mock" salmon

 

2 cups carrot pulp

1/3 cup raw saurkraut

3 tbls. raw tahini

juice 1-2 lemons, to taste

1 raw nori sheet, powdered, crumbled, shredded, or chopped fine

 

mash it up, serve on flax crackers, or better yet raw romaine leaves, or endive...

 

 

....as to not being into carrots, and banannas...

 

the poster above who mentioned the high glycemic rate for ripe banannas was onto something.

 

both carrots, and most modern day banannas are super hybridized, and genetically very weak plants, requiring lots of agricultural hijinx to grow, even organically.

 

for folks with yeast conditions the increased sugar in banannas, and especially large quantities of carrot juice can be unpleasant.

 

i think the fiber in just plain raw carrots might off set their glycemic index raw, but whatever.

 

so some folks choose to avoid these either because of their high sugar content, or their weak hybridized genetics.

 

or at least that's the theory... anyone who tells you they actually know something about nutrition, is either deluded, or lying i am begining to suspect...

 

(or possibly not everyone can know every dang thing about a subject.)

 

personally i no longer eat banannas, i just dislike the mushiness, and bland taste, empty calories be damned.

 

...but as for being afraid of sugar... i'll go toe to toe while any man alive in a barefisted watermelon eating contest!!!

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  • 3 weeks later...

I looked at him and I don't see him as anything exceptional. I think he looks a bit younger than his age but so does my dad who's 57 and looks even younger than he does yet eats lots of meat. He does look healthy but no more than any other fit-ish person I've seen his age...vegan or not.

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YOu all need to go check out DOUG GRAHAM!!

 

He eats like 20 bananas in one sitting!!!

 

Check out his site

www.foodnsport.com

 

Fruit NOT fat!!!

 

Personaly I don't think it's wise to pay too much attention to what others are doing or how they look because you are not them and they are not you....just look after yourself in all the right ways and you'll be the best you can be, too many people look elsewhere for the answers rather than looking to themselves where the answers are all a long.

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I think your right but then again if you put yourself out there as the example of health for your age then your out there to be judged...just like fat Dr. Phil and his diet plan for everyone else that overweight.

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Just came across this info in The Juice Feaster's Handbook by Angela Stokes:

 

"Try your best to limit the amount of hybridized fruits you use, as they tend to be harmful to the 'good' intestinal bacteria and feed fungal conditions like candida. Avoid anything labelled 'seedless' in particular - these over-sweet cross-breeds are biologically weak and lack vitality or a good mineral balance. Hybrids are dependent on chemicals for protection from insects, as they have been cultivated to be so sweet that they are extremely appealing to animals and would not survive if left to grow wild. Wild foods contain by far the most nutritional content and energy. Wild foods contain by far the most nutritional content and energy. Wild fruits tend to be small, fibrous and quite sour. Some common hybrid fruits and vegetables include: seedless apples, bananas, pineapples, grapes, watermelons, beetroots (beets), carrots and corn."

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