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Race Walking Videos


Bigbwii
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Race walkers are crazy...some people can walk sub 6min miles for a whole marathon which is just pure insanity

 

That's funny coz that's what I'm aiming for...but I'm gonna be aiming to race 20k's

 

I love using marathons for working out/my long days but not to race......

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Ha,ha...yeah it's a big joke to many people....it's a lot harder than running...infact when I'm walking my 27 miles it's a huge thrill to be passing people that are running!

 

I love it and I think I'm getting used to people making fun and not taking it seriously, after all I am a Fruitarian....so I've had my fair share of crap.

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A lot of people think its easy but its very difficult to "walk" that fast. To legally be walking 1 foot must always be on the ground and these guys can really burn up the road...try walking one lap on a track in 2 minutes...I promise you you will need to have both feet off the ground at some point and these guys do this for hours and do it 2 minutes faster. Also a lot of these guys run for cross training...some run sub 2:20 marathons which is faster than Brendan Brazier who has the Canadian Ultramarathon record.

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with running, you have to deal with the forces of gravity as you bob up and down, and everytime you land on your foot you have to strain your muscles, etc to support yourself.

 

with fast walking, you stay relatively the same distance from the ground and you probably work more muscles/different muscles, rather than fewer but stronger ones while running. So I'd assume any difficulty found in fast running is due to the person not having excersized those muscles in such a way compared to running which everyone has done quite alot.

 

which one is more efficient, i have no idea. But it would make sense to do fast walking over running if you are an older fellow, or if you don't want to stress your joints and such.

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I can imagine that walking is more efficent in the sense that it can be done with a fairly high HR for a longer period of time(this only goes for elite walkers). I can imagine the HR of an Olympic Walker and Marathon Runner is equally high and maybe even a bit higher for a runner but not by much. Also lactic acid build up would come more quickly through running.

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I can imagine that walking is more efficent in the sense that it can be done with a fairly high HR for a longer period of time(this only goes for elite walkers). I can imagine the HR of an Olympic Walker and Marathon Runner is equally high and maybe even a bit higher for a runner but not by much. Also lactic acid build up would come more quickly through running.

 

Your right on both counts....race walking when done to your full potential/speed is incredibly hard....it takes dedicated practise....

 

I'm still a newbie and I just nowable to walk at a very fast pace but I'm amazed at the thought of having to keep that pace up for a full half marathon, it's scary to see these guys whizzing around.....for hours!!!

 

walking is way more efficient and easier on the bones, etc....plus a lot of the race walkers are runners that got bad injuries from running.

 

People don't laugh at me because I'm in good shape and I look like I'm an athlete and people think I'm doing some hi-tek training but if I was some skinny dude I guess I'd be the laugh of the park.....

 

Believe me you would not be laughing if you had to do eight 400m with 2 mins rest at your fastest walking pace.....that just ain't no joke!

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Hey, cool! I've recently picked up a fascination with racewalking (or, aerobic walking) myself!

 

Walking is biomechanically less efficient than running, because running depends on the elastic snap-back of tendons and ligaments. But you hit the ground with the force of several times your body weight when you run, and the impact and "twang" imparted to your bones and tendons is really harsh. That's why you see just about every runner get an injury at some point ... while racewalkers (or less hardcore *fitness* walkers) almost never incur injury from their training.

 

Less efficient can be good! Walking a 12-minute mile burns more calories than running one (because of the energy-return effect of bouncing against your tendons isn't there) and gets your heart rate higher.

 

If I can get an intense cardio workout, with a fraction of the injury risk, I am all about it!!

 

The one thing I've found practicing fast walking, though, is soreness/lactic acid buildup in my tibialis anterior -- the muscle that runs down the outside of your shin. Not shin splints -- but muscle fatigue.

 

Having done some research, I found that I probably have dorsiflexion inflexibility (hard to lift my toes towards my shin) from stair-running and overly tight calves. So I've incorporated more stretching and am trying to strengthen that shin muscle.

 

Looking forward to training outside, when it's not 28 degrees F... Minnesota weather is in the deep freeze right now

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Hey, cool! I've recently picked up a fascination with racewalking (or, aerobic walking) myself!

 

Walking is biomechanically less efficient than running, because running depends on the elastic snap-back of tendons and ligaments. But you hit the ground with the force of several times your body weight when you run, and the impact and "twang" imparted to your bones and tendons is really harsh. That's why you see just about every runner get an injury at some point ... while racewalkers (or less hardcore *fitness* walkers) almost never incur injury from their training.

 

Less efficient can be good! Walking a 12-minute mile burns more calories than running one (because of the energy-return effect of bouncing against your tendons isn't there) and gets your heart rate higher.

 

If I can get an intense cardio workout, with a fraction of the injury risk, I am all about it!!

 

The one thing I've found practicing fast walking, though, is soreness/lactic acid buildup in my tibialis anterior -- the muscle that runs down the outside of your shin. Not shin splints -- but muscle fatigue.

 

Having done some research, I found that I probably have dorsiflexion inflexibility (hard to lift my toes towards my shin) from stair-running and overly tight calves. So I've incorporated more stretching and am trying to strengthen that shin muscle.

 

Looking forward to training outside, when it's not 28 degrees F... Minnesota weather is in the deep freeze right now

 

Yeah man I wasn't going that deep!!!

 

I meant that it was more effient for me because I can race walk way further than I can run.

 

Yeah the shin thing is a commomn thing

 

All the best...

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There are some good easy excersized to help you with your troubles. Mostly all college Track and Field athletes are forced to do them. Simply take your shoes off and walk for 30-50ft on the inside of your feet, then on the outsides, then on your heels, then on your toes...not repeat all of these backwards. They really help quite a bit.

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