Jump to content

Tell me about your art...


Recommended Posts

I noticed alot of different styles and how enthusiastic many were to discuss them. I also realized my ignorance of a few. Can you tell me what you think are the highlights/strengths of your various martial arts? I'm not going to be "converted," but it would be a great opportunity to share our enthusiasm. And please don't dog other styles, remember...there are no superior martial arts, only superior martial artists!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow...maybe I was wrong...no one wants to talk about their martial art style?! Is that because it's not that great or that it's too hard to do without doggin' other styles? COME ON! Isn't Kung Fu great for the physical/spiritual discipline? Isn't BJJ cool because of its rep in UFC? Isn't Wing Chun awesome because of the 80s song about it?!

I want to know! One of my hobbies is building fighting forces of extra ordinary magnitude-how can I do that if I don't know anything about all of the various fighting styles!?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The style I'm currently involved in is a kickboxing style that blends Shotokan Karate, Kyokushin and Muay Thai, with a smattering of Jujitsu. The style was developed by my sensei, Farid Dordar during his days as a shoot boxer and kickboxer. We do some katas and karate-style drills, but the emphasis is on fighting - so upright stances, useable kicks and punches. Fitness, speed and power are emphasized. We do a lot of sparring in class, and have full contact training 3 days a week for those interested. As far as fighting, the style seems to take the best from Muay Thai (we do leg kicks, round kicks, knees and practice elbows) and mixes it with some karate - so add spinning kicks basically. It's a good system - many of the club's fighters have done well in local, provincial and national level Muay Thai fights, as well as other kickboxing sanctions. Our top fighter, Blake Lirette has a K1 World Title, a National Muay Thai title and is starting to get into MMA. He won his first and only so far MMA fight. This month our dojo is adding an MMA class to its curriculum. I'm not sure of the exact format, but it will mix BJJ and Pankrase. We do some weapons training - bo, nunchaku, katana, sai, tonfa but it's not emphasized.

 

Right now I'm happy with my club. I'm getting great physical training. At 34 years old, I'm in the best shape of my life. It does lack a little in the spiritual department, so I can see moving on after a few more years to something like Aikido. That's pretty much it in a nutshell. I started as a kid doing Chito Ryu Karate and have dabbled over the years in a few other disciplines.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your info...I have some questions- is Muay Thai the same as Thai boxing? Is that a dumb question? When I lived in Germany several of my German friends were way into judo and Thai boxing...they employed it in confronting/destroying fascists...they were pretty hardcore that way. I remember their shins were just incredibly tough! It seems new styles are created all the time, is that correct? My advisor at WTAMU was way into karate, I think it was Shotokan, though I may be mistaken-I can find out later-either way, he was in incredible shape!

Thanks for your info-can you add more? Why does it appeal so much to you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Muay Thai is Thai boxing. There is also Burmese boxing, which I think is quite similar and there may be other south east Asian derivitives that are similar to Muay Thai. Sanshou is Chinese, I think, and has some similarities to Muay Thai, but has more throws. And yes, Muay Thai involves a lot of shin and thigh conditioning - leg kicks are a big part of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you find kicking to be that effective in a "street brawl"? I can see how kicks can be very strong, but are they practical? Is Muay Thai extremely physically demanding? What kind of conditioning does it require...other than kicking wooden pillars until your shins bleed! Incidently, I've heard the science behind that...apparently the bone actually recontruscts itself to be almost like iron...good stuff!

I wish aikido were more physically demanding...in his youth the founder was a brute of a man...you should see pics of him in his 30s...A MONSTER! But in his later years he favored technique over strength, but surely his earlier strength helped form the basis of the art...I've taken it upon myself to include some strength training and especially cardio...what good is technique if you are too exhausted to perform?! SEveral years ago I worked out at Nippon Kan-Gaku Homma's dojo (the founder's last uchideishi-live in student)...coming from Texas to the Rocky Mtns killed me! I almost blacked out on the mat...fortunately I regained my composuer before it all went black! But I was traveling down that dark grey tunnel! It took all my strength, I didn't want to give my dojo in Texas a bad rep...but that altitude nearly killed me! I'm really glad to be here in Laramie at 7200' above sea level!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I take Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. I have trained with and without the GI. I much prefer nogi jiu jitsu as I feel it suits me well. Strengths, would be an obvious and clear advantage in a one on one altercation. Students with only 6 months to a year of knowledge can be very effective in defending themselves. I think the number one weakness for most BJJ schools is lack of attention to detail in the art of takedowns. This has gotten better over the years, with wrestling and judo classes and techniques added more and more but still more emphasis should be added. Also, a good base in a solid stand up art would help any BJJ student. I personally prefer Muay Thai, but I believe any martial art with an emphasis on effective live training against a resisting opponent can be just as effective.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is the history of BJJ? Am I right in my understanding that it was the Gracie patriarch (Royce's grandfather)who stream lined the Juijitsu introduced by Japanese immigrants to Brazil to be more effective on the tough streets of Sao Paulo?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never had to use any martial art in self defence. In a street situation, I think leg kicks, esp to the knees, might be effective because they would not be expected and the opponent wouldn't be able to grab a leg easily. I would never attempt a high kick, because that could too easily land you on your ass. The best thing would be to use the leg conditioning and strength to run the hell away fast. If I had to fight, I'd want Jujitsu or BJJ skills + good punching skills. I think. Aikido or judo would also come in handy, but I think to use them in the real world you have to be fairly accomplished. My first Sensei teaches a pressure point system of his own design that is very effective. I'm hoping to start learning it later this summer when he visits from back east.

 

As for Muay Thai being good for fitness... any fight training is going to be rigorous and intense. If you're going to last several rounds, fighting, getting hit and still being able to think and strategize then you've got to be in peak shape. Fight training encompasses strength training, conditioning and cardio, so, yes, Muay Thai, or kickboxing would mean getting into good shape.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had to use aikido many, many times...and always the same technique...stay away from potential confrontation! ...so far its kept me alive. Though once I thought I was going to have to use it in a case of road rage...or roid rage...but the guy quit harrassing us and got off the highway...I think he figured we were calling the cops. Your response of using your leg strength to run away shows you have a great attitude about the arts...you will really like aikido one day...alot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've steered my way clear of a few potential situations while travelling and even right here in little old Vancouver. Awareness is the first part of self defence.

 

I'd only fight as a last resort. If I could run away, but, say my wife couldn't, I'd stay and fight. That is if she hadn't already dropped the attacker on her own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, awareness is key...in aikido we sometimes did an exercise about walking with purpose...I think it was more basic self defense than aikido, but it did utilize "ki" power...anyways, I've learned its not a good idea to show up on Ted Nuggent's door step in a PeTA T-shirt...it may invite trouble!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...