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Harley
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Has anyone been to Japan recently?

I am going for the first time in 2 weeks. I will be there for 3 weeks on business. I hear Japan is not very vegan friendly so I don't know how successful I will be staying raw and vegan.

 

I was wondering if any of you have been there and what you thought about it and if you had any recommendations.

 

I am excited about the trip though because I have always wanted to go there and I absolutely love Japanese food.

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Be prepared to spend a lot on fresh fruits and veggies. Almost all of their produce is imported because the government focuses all of it's subsidies on the rice growers.

 

I've heard mixed things. Raw will probably be expensive if you like lots of fresh fruits and veggies(and who doesn't?) so maybe plan for that in your budget.

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I took my family to Japan a few years ago, and yes it's VERY hard to find vegan options there. Probably even harder to be raw.

 

Some tips:

 

- Learn as much Japanese as you possibly can before going. It helps more than you can imagine. Japanese all take English in schools but many are bashful about speaking it. If you are in a bind trying to communicate, write down what you're trying to say as reading comprehension is MUCH higher than spoken.

 

- Buddy up. Try to find someone who is in Japan who may be Vegan or Raw. A local is a godsend in Japan and can help you navigate the extremely confusing street system (many places don't have addresses on them).

 

see: http://www.rawfoodsupport.com/read.php?6,36342,55923

 

- Italian is big in Japan, so you can do a pasta with red sauce in a pinch. It's also unlike any Italian you've had before. Also Thai is generally good.

 

There's a myth that a lot of people do Tofu in Japan. It's unfortunately not true. There are a few places which specialize in tofu I'll see if I can find the info in my files.

 

Having said all that, Japan is AMAZING. I'd go back in a heartbeat.

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Unless you are talking sushi I wouldn't trust any food from Asia. Check online and you may find some vegetarian restaurants but outside of that I'd stick to fruits, snacks you bring, and obviously vegan sushi. If you go to the wet markets on the street you should be able to find bananas, lots of types of plums and melons(very expensive though).

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  • 4 weeks later...

Yep, it is pretty hard to be vegan here let alone raw vegan. We are out in the field all day so I have all ready gone through a case of clif bars and Vega bars. (we are working in an area with no food places) At night we go out to dinner and they put fish in everything and everything is cooked. I can't wait to get home and have tons of fresh raw vegeatables to eat. I am also here with 2 meat eaters. Not bad but they do harrass me alot.

However, we just climed Mt. Fuji and I made it to the top and they did not. they were amazed that i beat them and I attributed it to not eating Mc.Porks (these pork sandwiches that McDonalds serves here) and other animals.

But all in all it had been a very interesting experience and the most physically demanding business trip I have ever been on.

I know I will be back here or somewhere else in Asia again soon

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Nice work. Hopefully it makes them rethink things a bit. They must feel weak now after not just finishing after a female vegan but not even finishing at all.

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we just climed Mt. Fuji and I made it to the top and they did not. they were amazed that i beat them and I attributed it to not eating Mc.Porks (these pork sandwiches that McDonalds serves here) and other animals.

 

haha awesome! (of course, your cycling fitness probably had something to do with it too, but I like the vegan explanation better!)

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  • 15 years later...

Howdy! Maiko, Geisha and Geiko are all traditional Japanese female entertainers who perform various arts such as classical music, dance, games and conversation, primarily for the entertainment of male customers.

However, there is a difference in the training and status:

Maiko: A Maiko is a young trainee geisha, usually under the age of 20, who is undergoing apprenticeship to become a full-fledged geisha. They wear elaborate, heavily embroidered kimono and have distinctive hairstyles and makeup.

Geisha: A Geisha is a fully trained and accomplished female entertainer who has completed her apprenticeship as a Maiko. They usually serve tea and drinks, play musical instruments, and engage in conversation and games with their clients.

Geiko: "Geiko" is the term used in the Kyoto dialect to refer to a geisha, whereas "Geisha" is commonly used in the Tokyo dialect. They have similar roles and responsibilities as a Geisha, but the term is specific to Kyoto.

If you want to know more about this topic, you should visit this page about
maiko vs. geisha where you can learn much more about this topic.

In conclusion, the main difference between these three is their level of training and experience, with Maiko being the youngest and newest, and Geiko being a fully trained and experienced entertainer.

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  • 1 month later...
Quote

Hey folks! Could you please tell me what is the difference between Maiko, Geisha and Geiko? Thanks in advance!

Ahaha)) if you want to understand the culture of Japan, then you need to look in the wrong direction. There are ancient traditions of same-sex love. Right now you can see it in yaoi manga or if you check this content on dating sites.Modern Japanese people are very tolerant of private life. I really really like the way it's set up there. But it is not necessary to go to Japan to learn everything in practice. There are special dating sites for every country now.

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