Jump to content

Protein powder comparative amino acid analysis


Troy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Gemma Protein Isolate is derived and isolated from peas and its natural protein fraction. Gemma Protein Isolate Powder is extremely high in Leucine, Arginine, and Glutamine, along with a balanced amino profile. Gemma is NON-GMO, low allergenic and gluten free. The bioavailability is at approximately 90-95%.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 187
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

(I don't remember how you can have over 100g of amino acids in 100g sample, someone remind me please... thanks)

 

I might as well take a stab.

 

Basic answer is ...You can't since the sum of parts can't equal more than the whole!! But here are my thoughts on the discrepancy:

 

My first thought was that you had crunched the numbers incorrectly. But then I went to the True Protein website and saw that you got the numbers directly from the gemma page. Assuming the grams AA per 100 gm sample are not typos, I would say two things could be happening. One - the analysis performed on this protein was reported in a percent range, and the upper limit was used in calculating the individual AAs. Or, two, the analysis was reported as a percentage (not a range) but there may have been interference between the individual AAs during analysis causing some to be counted more than once. I had a similar occurence with some analytical work I had done for metals in a sample that added up to 116%. The lab performing the analysis explained it as interference.

 

I think the only way to know for sure is to contact the company and asked how they arrived at their AA data.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Neven.

 

Josh, I think that's one of the formulas that contains creatine. I am currently using one that doesn't have creatine as an ingredient since I use it when not creatine cycling. I wanted to see if using arginine and citrulline would make a difference without other additives. Since I'm still making fair strength gains at the gym, I assume that it's doing something. But that's just a very subjective opinion.

 

You also have to remember, when creatine first came out the technical studies weren't readily available; most of the claims were based on anecdotal and subjective evidence. As time went on and the compound was studied, we have found conclusively that it does indeed increase strength levels and lean muscle tissue synthesis. So the moral of the story is just because there aren't too many studies YET that show the efficacy of nitric oxide products, does not mean the claims are (largely) untrue. I know nitric oxide products have worked for many many people. For me, I notice vascularity throughout the day when I would commonly have none, and harder, fuller pumps. The increase in strength I'm not sure about, but I certainly look and feel fuller and harder on NO products.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have sent the following email to True Protein: I will be post their reply when I receive it.

 

Hey guys, I'm the guy who posted the amino acid profile chart on the Supplement Forum, Protein Sub-Forum, that is stickied.

 

Question: When doing my analysis I came across a strange data error that noone has addressed yet. When adding up the amino acid profile for Gemma, I don't understand how you can have 100g of amino acids in 100g sample. Is this an error by your supplier data or is there another explanation for this? Thank You for your help...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(I don't remember how you can have over 100g of amino acids in 100g sample, someone remind me please... thanks)

 

Here's the answer, found it from a protein supplement vendor's faq.

 

Why the does the total mg of the amino acids add up-to over 1000mg? This can't be possible?

 

The answer to this is to do with the technique used for analysis. The amino acids are present as longer peptide chains, but in order to measure the amino acid content the peptide bonds between the amino acids have to be broken by hydrolysis which introduces water into the molecule and hence adds weight.

 

Thus when you add up all the amino contents as analysed and compare the total to the original 100g of protein there will appear to be more than 100 g of amino acids.

 

The dairy assure me this is the correct way of expressing the content and if people are declaring figures which do add up to 100 g then they are omitting the water introduced during analysis.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...
So what is wrong with a calcium caseinate, whey iso or albumin? Does anyone even supplement with BCAA's or glutamine?

 

Calcium caseinate, whey, albumin, ie. milk,milk, egg, ie. dairy, ie. animal products = not vegan. I just stopped using BCAA's and glutamine not because they weren't vegan, just think I don't really need them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So what is wrong with a calcium caseinate, whey iso or albumin? Does anyone even supplement with BCAA's or glutamine?

 

Calcium caseinate, whey, albumin, ie. milk,milk, egg, ie. dairy, ie. animal products = not vegan. I just stopped using BCAA's and glutamine not because they weren't vegan, just think I don't really need them.

 

Also I would add, they don't offer anything nutritionnally interesting except for the proteins. Some have calcium, perhaps there's still some vitamins like albumin from white egg (?) but that's it. There's also some studies saying that high quantity of proteins may cause osteoporis. Thing is that some people say that does not happens when it's vegan proteins instead of dairies and other animal proteins.

"The main problem is the consumption of animal protein; studies have shown that protein from non-animal sources has health benefits. So the answer to preventing osteoporosis is not to consume a lot of dairy products, but to reduce animal protein consumption (...)"

http://www.jewishveg.com/schwartz/pcmyths.html

"It has been known for nearly 80 y that increasing protein intake increases urinary calcium loss "

"Indeed, a few observational studies reported an adverse association of high protein intakes with bone health (3). However, others found exactly the opposite"

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/75/4/609

... So we don't know what to believe concerning the possible inconvenients about whey and casein on calcium,

but one thing is sure, it's exploitation of the animals, and can cause other health problems than calcium loss on our health, like higher risks of breast cancers and other cancers.

 

If we look at cold processed protein isolates like hemp, spirulina, chlorella, there's way more than just proteins, it's some of the foods that contains the highest quantities and largest range of vitamins and minerals on Earth and it's full of benefits for health. Samething with brewer's yeast and other nutritional yeasts, which are over 50% proteins, containing all amino acids.

Even soy isolate, which is processed at high temperatures, is still a source of (depends which brand) calcium, iron, zinc, copper, phosphorus, magnesium, complex B vitamins, it has ability to help lower the cholesterol level, and the isoflavones in it have benefits not only for women but for men too. Studies now show that there's no negative effect from soy on testosterone level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

http://www.trueprotein.com/Product_Details.aspx?cid=22&pid=6816

 

"Gemma Protein Isolate Powder is extremely high in Leucine, Arginine, and Glutamine, along with a balanced amino profile. It is clean tasting for a Pea Protein, and mixes extremely smoothly with a lighter texture than Whey powders.

 

Gemma Protein Isolate is derived and isolated from peas and its natural protein fraction, which possesses a low level of denaturing and is very soluable (mixes very well). Gemma is NON-GMO, low allergenic and gluten free.

 

As dairy prices continue to rise, vegetable-based products like the new Gemma Protein will begin to change the protein industry.

 

The digestibility of this product is at approximately 90-95%." -TP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
I just ordered a 45 pea / 35 hemp / 20 rice blend from trueprotein. (They only have 5% increments now). I'll see if it makes my workouts complimentary and synergistic.

 

This ratio yields an amino acid score of about 124 on nutritiondata.com... great ratios!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just ordered a 45 pea / 35 hemp / 20 rice blend from trueprotein. (They only have 5% increments now). I'll see if it makes my workouts complimentary and synergistic.

 

This ratio yields an amino acid score of about 124 on nutritiondata.com... great ratios!!!

Just trying to mimic the 4:3:2 pea:hemp:rice someone quoted from BB's Thrive book. I don't have that book (I have the thrive diet but it doesn't explicitly give the ratios in terms of mass) so I'm just taking this thread's word for it.

 

In top of the amino acid score, I'm thinking this will actually taste decent and blend better than straight pea which thickens a bit too much IMO.

 

Here it is on ND: http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/recipe/569984/1 I have to read how they calculate that amino score number. I would have thought the blend would be roughly an average of them all. Maybe that fan illustration is deceptive and things aren't really maxed out when all the bars are full.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An interesting find I just made... my overall daily amino acid score comes to 126 using Gemma as my main protein powder. I switched the gemma for the 70/30 gemma/rice and the daily amino acid score came to 115 even though the gemma-rice has a better score in itself. It seems the solo gemma fits better into my diet, filling more gaps. So again, judging all the food you eat in a day is a better representative of the quality of your amino acid pool. Glad I did that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An interesting find I just made... my overall daily amino acid score comes to 126 using Gemma as my main protein powder. I switched the gemma for the 70/30 gemma/rice and the daily amino acid score came to 115 even though the gemma-rice has a better score in itself. It seems the solo gemma fits better into my diet, filling more gaps. So again, judging all the food you eat in a day is a better representative of the quality of your amino acid pool. Glad I did that.

That is interesting. As if things needed to be even more complex.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well now any gains beyond an AA score of 100 will be minimal, right? I mean, it's hard for the body to use a protein with greater than a 'perfect' AA score...

It's my understanding at this second in time that you are right if looking at the diet as a whole (as Troy did). However looking at a particular meal a higher than 100 score can be beneficial to balance out inferior proteins (under 100) that are being ingested. Of course just because one is over 100 it doesn't necessarily balance out one under 100 since the excess and limiting amino acids need to match, as illustrated in Troy's example.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share




×
×
  • Create New...