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Still a scrawny turd...


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nobody answered your original question about your routine.

 

You should ABSOLUTELY change your strength routine every 3 - 4 weeks to avoid plateaus. So yes, if you've been doing this for a few months, time to change up the exercises

I switched up the 5x5 routine. Started doing sets of 8 7 6 6 and increasing weight as the reps get lower. I didn't really feel i was getting a good workout from the 5x5 routine. Probably cause im still inexperienced.

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nobody answered your original question about your routine.

 

You should ABSOLUTELY change your strength routine every 3 - 4 weeks to avoid plateaus. So yes, if you've been doing this for a few months, time to change up the exercises

I switched up the 5x5 routine. Started doing sets of 8 7 6 6 and increasing weight as the reps get lower. I didn't really feel i was getting a good workout from the 5x5 routine. Probably cause im still inexperienced.

 

It doesnt' matter if you feel like you're getting a good workout, what matters is that you get results. Forget about training for an "optimal pump" or whatever, progressive overload is the key to maximizing gains, not muscle burn.

 

5x5 will work for damn near anyone, stick with it until you've developed a solid foundation of strength and mass and then move on to a Max-OT or a Doggcrapp or whatever else tickles your fancy in order to maximize your muscle fiber recruitment and continue to make steady progress on your physique.

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nobody answered your original question about your routine.

 

You should ABSOLUTELY change your strength routine every 3 - 4 weeks to avoid plateaus. So yes, if you've been doing this for a few months, time to change up the exercises

 

Sorry, but I disagree with this completely. It takes WAY more than 3-4 weeks to get the most out of a routine. You have to pick a type of training, stick with it for awhile, and change it up ONLY after you've hit a plateau (which can be anywhere from 12 weeks to a couple of years - The Westside, Doggcrapp, and Max-OT gurus are using the same training parameters for literally years on end and make excellent progress throughout.)

 

I'm sure there are ways to train where you can gain well out of changing things up frequently (I've heard people say that they've gained well by doing Waterbury style training where they go in 2 week cycles of specific sets of parameters and make subtle changes every 2 weeks or so), but it's not the be all end all of training and progression like some people make it out to be.

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  • 1 year later...

Holy smokes - no longer 118lbs(53.5kg). About 4.5 months ago I eased up on tracking my macros, and continued to lift heavy. I'm upto 140lbs(63.5kg) now. I feel much better, and less stressed. Although, I still feel kinda weak, and look wimpy, but it's a start.

 

My lower body is feeling much stronger - while my upper half is still lacking. Oddly, my squats have gone down to around 200lbs(90.7kg), and deadlifts have shot up to 280lbs(127kg).

 

I've been popping in and out of here, but haven't been participating as much.

 

Hope everyone is doing well.

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My lower body is feeling much stronger - while my upper half is still lacking. Oddly, my squats have gone down to around 200lbs(90.7kg), and deadlifts have shot up to 280lbs(127kg).

 

Woah! squatting 90,7kg and DL'ing 127kg at a body weight of 63 is impressive!

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My lower body is feeling much stronger - while my upper half is still lacking. Oddly, my squats have gone down to around 200lbs(90.7kg), and deadlifts have shot up to 280lbs(127kg).

 

Woah! squatting 90,7kg and DL'ing 127kg at a body weight of 63 is impressive!

really? I think I should be lifting a bit more since I gained some weight.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Nothing wrong with pulling 300 @ 140 lbs. bodyweight - plenty of guys I've seen struggle with less than that and weigh more than you do.

 

Looking good, for sure. You definitely have a fast lockout once it clears the knees - work on that initial pull a bit and I bet that you'll find that you can add a lot more weight before too long.

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Nothing wrong with pulling 300 @ 140 lbs. bodyweight - plenty of guys I've seen struggle with less than that and weigh more than you do.

 

Looking good, for sure. You definitely have a fast lockout once it clears the knees - work on that initial pull a bit and I bet that you'll find that you can add a lot more weight before too long.

 

So a fast lockout is bad? I know my form is pretty poor on this. That was my 7th set - i was pretty beat. Thanks for the headsup

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Fast lockout isn't bad at all - it goes to show that your hip and hamstring strength for the final part of the movement is solid and very strong, making the lockout easier for you. Most people tend to be fast to the knees or fast from the knees to lockout - I was always fast to the knees, then it would get tougher for me, and you just seem to be the opposite, which is just how it goes. It just means that in time, you'll likely want to put more of your work toward making the initial pull easier, as that's the part that seems to be tougher for you. If you find that your lower back is making the initial pull tougher, then that would denote a need to strengthen that area more to speed your initial pull (or, work to incorporate the legs more if they're not being activated effectively from the start). If you find that it's more in the legs for what gives a tougher start, then you know what needs work. It's all about identifying what part is of the lift is tougher for you, then building the weaker part up to balance things out over time (just like in bodybuilding ). If you can ever get a side view of your deadlifting, that would be even more helpful to find out where any imbalances lie as front views don't always tell the whole story. From the bit I see, it looks like your butt rises a bit quick and it tips you forward a bit, then the first half of the pull is all lower back work. If that's the case, getting your form down tight so that you get more leg drive initially while keeping your torso from angling forward will probably make your numbers jump up considerably once the new technique becomes second nature. But again, tough to analyze from the front only, so if you get the chance to shoot a side shot, post one here some time and we'll see what we can do to help out!

 

Like I said, good pulling, and you did it for a double, so that's even better!

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You're spot on - Ryan told me almost the same thing. The initial pull is where I feel the weakest. I feel like I'm not driving completely with my legs, and I'm slightly hunched over.

 

My legs will probably be wrecked for a few days. I'll try to get some better footage next week.

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