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Book Reading Mission... need advice...


Troy
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So I set myself on a mission... I did some research both here and other places and I want to read some vegan/nutritional/influential books. I purchased the following books and I'm wondering if anyone has an opinion regarding what order I should read them? Also does anyone think there are other essential vegan/nutritional books that I have left out? I'm not looking for any cooking or recipe books. Its hard to weed through all of those.

 

Becoming Vegan - Completed March 11, 2008

Eat to Live - Completed April 19, 2008

The Thrive Diet - Completed November 19, 2008

Mad Cowboy - Completed November 30, 2008

Animal Ingredients - Skimmed

The China Study - Completed February 9, 2009

How to Win Friends & Influence People - Made it halfway, didn't finish yet

The Food Revolution

Diet for a New America

Edited by Troy
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Great list!

How To Win Friends and Influence People is one of my all time favorite books!

 

Thanks robert... I've seen this book listed by you several times and by a few others too, so I best check it out...

 

1. The Food Revolution

2. The China study

3. Eat to Live

 

Any particular reason why I should start and go in this order?

 

I would also recommend World Peace Diet

 

I'll add it to the list... thank you

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Just my opinion, considering what little I know of you from this forum:

 

1) Becoming Vegan

2) Plant Based Nutrition and Health by Stephen Walsh, Phd (an English publication, available through Vegan Outreach, I think)

3) China Study

 

The other vegan books are not as well researched, IMO, and contain information that you already know. Not that you shouldn't read them. As far as How to Win Friends and Influence People - I don't think you really need that one, LOL.

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Great list!

How To Win Friends and Influence People is one of my all time favorite books!

 

Thanks robert... I've seen this book listed by you several times and by a few others too, so I best check it out...

 

1. The Food Revolution

2. The China study

3. Eat to Live

 

Any particular reason why I should start and go in this order?

 

I would also recommend World Peace Diet

 

I'll add it to the list... thank you

 

Hey Troy,

 

How To Win Friends and Influence People is one of the most influential books I've read. And it has obviously worked I've become one of the most influential vegan athletes and I have more friends than I can keep up with; two by-products of the influence this book had on me when I read it at a young age.

 

Enjoy it!

 

Enjoy the others too.

 

I think you're a pretty awesome guy!

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Plant Based Nutrition and Health

 

Just ordered. thanks DV!

 

 

Enjoy it!

 

Enjoy the others too.

 

I think you're a pretty awesome guy!

 

Thanks robert, your encouragement motivates me and as I'm sure it motivates alot of others... I'll post some reviews as I finish them...

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Great list!

How To Win Friends and Influence People is one of my all time favorite books!

 

Thanks robert... I've seen this book listed by you several times and by a few others too, so I best check it out...

 

1. The Food Revolution

2. The China study

3. Eat to Live

 

Any particular reason why I should start and go in this order?

 

I would also recommend World Peace Diet

 

I'll add it to the list... thank you

I chose that order because Food revolution will give you a good overview of all aspects of the positives of a plant diet, China Study digs deepr into the nutrition aspect and Eat to Live gives a practical way of dealing with that information.

As with anything you read you should always have a critical mindset. I do not agree with everything Joel Fuhrman says for example and I've read so much about these things so that I know what he can back up and what he cannot back up as strongly.

Also. DV suggested a book called "Sacred cows and golden geese" that I've read most of. It gives a critical view of the scientific aspects of animal testing. It will help to have that view when reading magazines, books and other publications on diet and nutrition since some of them are actually based on only one study on some animal. After reading the book you'll find out just how pointless such information is.

I'd say DV is the backbone of the brain trust in here. If she suggests reading anything, read it.

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LOL, Offense! I use the phrase brain trust a lot - but usually in a negative sense.

 

Thanks for remembering "Sacred Cows and Golden Geese: The Human Cost of Animal Experiments" by the Greeks (one is an anesthesiologist and the other is a veterinarian). I forgot about that one.

 

I would also highly suggest reading some books on omega 3 fatty acids, although they aren't aimed at vegans as an audience. I'm starting another one this weekend, although I have 2 favorites already - I'll post later, just in case I think this book tops them.

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Troy,

 

Have you read "Eat to Live" yet? I'd like your opinion although I'll probably get it from the library anyway.

 

The two books on omega fatty acids that I would recommend are:

 

"The Queen of Fats" by Susan Allport (Sept. 2006) This book gives you the background of the discovery of essential fatty acids along with the mistaken belief that they were all the same. You can see how the promotion of vegetable oils have (possibly) contributed to the inflammatory diseases of affluence. It also gives you a healthy suspicion about new (or old) nutrition claims. In addition, the chemical/physical descriptions of the fatty acids help you to see how the long chains of DHA, for instance, are suited for marine plants and the brain.

 

"The Ultimate Omega 3 Diet" by Evelyn Tribole (May, 2007) I read this one months ago and only remember that it did add to the knowledge gained from the first. Of all those written in 2007, I found this to be the best researched.

 

You've got quite a list already, but I do have one more suggestion for the future. "Food Politics" by Marion Nestle. This one is long and a bit dry at times. However, it is a fascinating look at the politics behind food in advertising, education, the pyramid, etc. in the U.S. The author is one of the only well-known nutritionists who does not have financial ties to the food industry and can therefore bash the process without financial consequence.

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  • 3 weeks later...

So I just finished reading Becoming Vegan. Overall the book was a good introduction book to a vegan diet. I felt it reiterated basic nutrition principles with some new added knowledge for me. It is a bit tiring at times as some chapters duplicate the same information over again.

 

The chapters I enjoyed the most were the following:

 

Chapter 8 Phytochemicals... Powerful protection from plants. - Fantastic information!!!

 

Chapter 16 The Vegan Athlete - Good reinforcement of all prior chapters and directing it towards the athlete. Of course I wish it had more on bodybuilding or more attention to building muscle mass.

 

Chapter 17 Vegan Diplomacy - Very useful for someone like me starting a plant based diet. As I get through more books, I will look forward to reading more books regarding this topic.

 

Next on the list....

 

Eat to Live

 

Side note: I have a confession to make... Becoming Vegan was my the first real book that I have read cover to cover. The only other "book" that I have read to it's entirety is Sneaker Freaker... which is a 288 page compilation of Sneaker Freaker Magazines. The other closest is "Where'd You Get Those", another book about sneakers, and the other is "Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill", neither of which I never finished completely, but about 90%. How may you ask that I have a 4 year (actually 6 year) University Degree and have never read a complete book. Alot of skimming and skipping information. Alot of cliff notes too. I don't tend to have the patience to sit down and dedicate time to reading paper books. I like to pull parts of information from books and have gained a vast amount of knowledge from the internet over the past 10 years. I feel I am a very knowledgeable person on the things that interest me but I feel I have come to a halt with the amount of information that I have found on the internet regarding my passion for a plant based diet. I feel that the next step is to really encompass it by reading book after book about it until I feel like I get the full picture, seen by as many angles as possible, that is what I hope to achieve. I hope this doesn't lessen my credibility when I respond to posts as I've learned alot of information from a variety of other sources than books, ie. people, personal experience, magazines, etc... Thanks for reading this small font, and cheers to me and reading my first real complete book at the age of 30! Woo.

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I think that book is a great read mostly to answer questions of others... "Why don't you guys eat honey... that doesen't make sense".... "What's the big deal about leather?"

 

That is what it served best for me. Having intelligent answers at my fingertips for inquiring non-vegans....

 

Congrats on finishing the book in its entirety since that has been an issue for you.

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I just started a new one that I think is going to significantly change my opinion of supplemental vitamins and minerals - "The REAL Vitamin & Mineral Book" by Sahri Leiberman PhD, CNS, FACN and Nancy Bruning, MPH (2007 edition).

 

They give very provocative reasons for taking supplements, call the RDIs (formerly RDAs) the minimum wage of nutrients, and expose some of the nutritional myths that I (and many others) have been fed.

 

Of particular note (so far) is the observation that even with a "perfect" diet we can only approach the RDIs, not an optimal level of vitamin/mineral intake. One reason why is our depleted soil (this includes organic). While we need 26 different minerals, plants only need 16 so even the most healthy looking organic vegetables aren't delivering as much mineral content as in the past. She does not suggest using supplements as a crutch, however. She states that our nutritional knowledge is doubling every 5-10 years and there are many substances in plants that we need but haven't even discovered.

 

Be warned that this isn't written with vegan beliefs. She defends using animal studies near the beginning of the book. But that's not a reason to listen to the rest of her information.

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  • 1 month later...
Have you read "Eat to Live" yet? I'd like your opinion although I'll probably get it from the library anyway.

 

Just finished it...

 

Overall I think it is a fantastic book. Great nutritional information throughout! Although not fully vegan I think his recommendations are excellent. I found that I was already consuming some of his recommendations... ie. 1 lb of leafy greens a day.

 

A few things I found interesting is his view on excluding Vitamin A and beta-carotene supplements. He's pretty atimate about leaving it out so I might continue my search for a vegan multi that has neither. I've come up pretty short on my search and I'm not paying 30 some bones for a multi from Dr. F. Anyways, his view on this is contrary to what I read in Becoming Vegan but I like taking bits and pieces and incorporating them into my diet.

 

However, with relation to the athlete I find this diet somewhat difficult to fully encompass due to the high volume of nutrient dense foods you would have to consume to meet your calorie needs.

 

He suggests a ratio of:

30-70% -- Veggies (half raw, half cooked) or 1 lb of raw leafy And a 1lb of cooked greens

10-50% -- Fruits

10-30% -- Beans/Legumes

5-20% -- Whole Grains, Raw Nuts, Seeds

Once weekly or less - Oils

Rarely -- Processed Food

 

Interestingly enough, even though I'm putting down a pound of kale a day... my ratio doesn't even come close to his recommendations... heres where I am:

8.9% Veggies (21.1% off his minimum)

20.4% Fruit (Lower half of his rec.)

0% Beans/Legumes (Gimme a break, my gas is bad enough)

53.6% -- Whole Grains, Raw Nuts, Seeds (2.5 times his rec, I included my Ezekiel cereal in this category even though its processed)

6.7% -- Oil (Udo's - My DHA source)

8.9% -- Processed Food (Gemma Protein)

 

As you can see, I don't even come close. I just don't think it's feasible for myself to consume that many veggies at this point, especially while trying to build muscle... not that I won't get there someday, but as of right now, my digestive system is maxed out on fiber.

 

There is also a brief mention in the book about suggesting other viewpoints in the diet world which I thought was honorable, and I may check his recommendations out at some point. (Page 113)

 

Anyways, 2 down, many more to go... reading is tough right now, Gran Turismo 5: Prologue just came out, Grand Theft Auto 4 is around the corner, and I just beat God of War 2 which was one of the best games I have ever played. Theres only a few games I play, and I haven't been playing video games more than once a month (if that) over the past 2 years but when some of my favorite games are releasing new titles, I can't resist... fret not, my video game obsession comes and goes as I dominate the game in due time.

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@Troy:

It doesn't come through enough in the book that it is in fact a diet book. It's written for people who are overweight and sedentary.

Joel Fuhrman himself eats more whole grains and nuts than he recommends for the dieters in his book for example.

Also, and this doesn't come through enough in the book either, he believes in CRON and to a lesser extent intermediate fasting to promote health. I tend to believe this too, to an extent. Some of the biggest health problems we have are due to our extensive energy consumption regardless of the amount/ratio between the macronutrients (fat, carbs and protein).

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I think offense74 is right: Fuhrman recommends uping your intake of nuts and seeds, plus grains if you are an working out a lot.

 

He has a great series of podcasts as well on iTunes. The "Dancng with the Stars episode" addresses some of the issues facing athletes. But I believe his advice boils down to eating more nuts and seeds, plus some more healthy grains. The key is to still get a tons of nutrient dense foods.

 

I basically try to follow a Fuhrman "diet-style", although a bit altered to fit my needs. When I first went vegan, my diet centered around apples, tomatoes, garlic, onions, bananas, brown rice, pasta, bread, hummus, quinoa, waffles, and fake meat products. I found that I felt good and healthy (compared to the omni days), but I was always hungry. I never felt full. At some point, I'd just get bored eating, and then I stop for two or three hours.

 

Since I moved to a more Fuhrman-like diet, with tons and tons of greens, even more fresh friut, more salads, less grains, less oil, almost no salt, and almost no processed foods, I've found that:

 

1) I often feel full after meals, and the feeling lasts for a long time.

2) My mental function seems better (despite whatver my wife says )

3) It's somewhat changed m view of how "easy" or "hard" it is to be vegan in a certain area, because to some degree, you just need a decent supermarket with fresh produce, seeds, nuts, and beans. Before, I somewhat measured the ease of being vegan through the prism of if you could easily find fake meat products, or other processed products.

 

Anyway, Troy, that was a great write-up. I hope you keep us updated as check off more books on the list!

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  • 7 months later...

Some quick reviews and updates:

 

Thrive Diet - Great read overall, thought some references would be nice to add in but I'm don't think I noticed too many so the book comes off a bit opinion based. Will incorporate some of his tips in the near future.

 

Mad Cowboy - Really interesting and learning things about the meat and dairy industry that I didn't know before. Eye opening... even wider.

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  • 2 months later...

China Study - Great overall read and the single best plant-based nutrition based book I have read, along with Becoming Vegan and Eat to Live.

 

Side Note: Its disappointing to find that when you do a google search for "china study review" the first hit is the Weston Price thumbs up thumbs down review.

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China Study - Great overall read and the single best plant-based nutrition based book I have read, along with Becoming Vegan and Eat to Live.

 

Side Note: Its disappointing to find that when you do a google search for "china study review" the first hit is the Weston Price thumbs up thumbs down review.

 

It is interesting to read the reviews of "The China Study" on Amazon. A few reviewers there come off as hostile, like Campbell personally offended them. They also discredit the science and Campbell....without mentioning details or their own credentials.

Blow hards.

 

I keep hearing so much about this book. Your review seals it. I am going to read it some time this year.

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