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sugar, fructose, glucose, sucrose and muscle


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hello all,

 

Sugar consumption...for someone concerned about muscle growth, leaness, and avoiding fat storage, how much sugar should be consumed? which is better, sugars from fruits or table sugar (white & brown)? which fruits have the least amount of sugar and are best to eat? what is stevia? again my concern is muscle gain/maintanance and not developing a flabby gut....thanks

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i'm not the most knowledgeable on this, but if you are adamant about not gaining any fat, refined sugar should be avoided. stevia is a super sweet powder made from a south american plant that is virtually calorie free. in general, watch out for the hidden sources of sugar, especially in protein bars (ie cliff builders bars, they taste great, but carry 20g of sugar from brs) and sport drinks

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If you want to avoid fat storage you should eat sugars with a low glicemic profile that don't raise the blood sugar level, so they don't raise the insulin level neither. So you can eat any fruits, raw carrots. For the complex carbs it's the same thing, you can eat soy and most other beans, whole grains.

 

To increase muscle growth, some say you need a low blood sugar level in order to facilitate the growth hormones production. But some say you need a high post-workout insulin level, because it is an anabolic hormone like testosterone, really useful to gain lean mass (and also fat mass I guess) they suggest drinking refined sugar, like a Gatorade, before or same time than a protein shake. Refined sugar combined with proteins at the same meal cause an insulin peak.

 

My only source of sugar is from fruits, if I take refined sugar it's post-workout.

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You aren't gonna get fat if you eat mostly fruits for your sugar. I lost most of my weight eating fruits as my main carb source(and I'm talking a lot of weight). The key is using fruits when you need energy. And if you can stomach it(kind of)...don't eat anything for two hours after working out. You'll feel run down and you'll really want to eat but thats because your body is craving sugar. If you don't give it any...your body will eat itself. This works great when you've got a lot of spare fat. Once you lose most of it you need some food for recovery for the next days workout.

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  • 2 months later...
i'm not the most knowledgeable on this, but if you are adamant about not gaining any fat, refined sugar should be avoided. stevia is a super sweet powder made from a south american plant that is virtually calorie free. in general, watch out for the hidden sources of sugar, especially in protein bars (ie cliff builders bars, they taste great, but carry 20g of sugar from brs) and sport drinks

 

DUDE!!! i am soo glad you said that i was eating those cliff bars and blown away by how much sugar they have in them YUK!!

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  • 3 weeks later...
i'm not the most knowledgeable on this, but if you are adamant about not gaining any fat, refined sugar should be avoided. stevia is a super sweet powder made from a south american plant that is virtually calorie free. in general, watch out for the hidden sources of sugar, especially in protein bars (ie cliff builders bars, they taste great, but carry 20g of sugar from brs) and sport drinks

 

DUDE!!! i am soo glad you said that i was eating those cliff bars and blown away by how much sugar they have in them YUK!!

Is 20g a lot of sugar? Organic Food Bars have 22g and I've been eating a couple a week. I never really pay attention to sugar, or carbs.

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Yeah me neither. I don't add sugar to anything I eat, but if I want a Clif Bar, well then it has enough fiber, fat, and protein to slow down the sugar digestion and help with insulin spike.

 

 

Lets not get carried away here and say that a Clif Bar is equivalent to a soda or anything...

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Very good points, Fallen_Horse. The glycemic load of food (the ability to increase blood glucose and therefore insulin levels) is affected by all the foods consumed in one sitting. It's important to look at the whole picture.

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