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Richard

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Posts posted by Richard

  1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpUNa5Y3VQg

     

    If you are going to do bodyweight stuff, I recommend high volume. If you struggle with high volume of reps pet set, then do low reps per set, but then do a high volume of sets. So for instance if your absolute max for press ups is say 15, then do sets of 10, and do as many as you can. That way you could easily do 100. Where as if you keep pushing to your limit, then you will struggle in each subsequent set.

  2. Well it really depends on the results you get. You could keep track of workouts where you wanted to ejaculate beforehand but chose not to, and ones where you had chosen to ejaculate, and see how you perform in the gym. I can't really see how it could have that much of an effect one way or the other. Unless you had a prolonged kind of sex session which was very physical, then it wouldn't just be a matter of ejaculating, you'd already have done cardio too

  3. Well, on a personal immediate level, i just want to avoid causing unnecessary harm, and i see animal products and animal tested products as extremely harmful and extremely unnecessary.

     

    On a wider more practical scale, the fewer people buy these products, the less demand there is, therefore the less stock will be ordered in stores, therefore the less demand there is on farmers, therefore the less animals are bred, exploited and killed. To say 'the animals will be killed anyway regardless of whether you buy it' is ignorant. Farmers can't produce a never-ending supply, they have to just meet demand. If the food stores are not selling as much, they won't order as much, simple as that.

     

    To those who say veganism/vegetarianism is pointless, I say - what would happen if all the vegetarians and vegans suddenly started buying an average quantity of animal products? Demand would increase significantly... Therefore the impact we have day to day is significant. It is a boycott of harmful and unethical practices, making those industries less profitable than they otherwise would be with our support. It is a practical effort. It's like saying 'i won't bother voting because one vote out of millions doesn't mean anything'. A lone vegetarian means nothing at all to the meat industry, sure. But in my country, 5% of the population is vegetarian, and about 1 in 16 of those is vegan. So it is not a futile or self-righteous cause, it has an impact.

     

    And it is not even limited to those, like us, who eliminate all, or certain kinds, of animal products. Even people who are cutting back, for health or financial reasons, are contributing. Even if they cut back by one meal a week, on a large scale, it can have a massive impact.

  4. Yeah, I understand how you could take what I said that way, and I don't like to condescend, but I'm just calling it how I see it, it's not my intention to judge, just trying to get it straight. I don't understand how you can criticize the vegan diet, saying you can't find the nutrition and feeling of satisfaction that you want - then when you drop veganism, you eat pizza, chocolate and cake. I'd understand if you were eating some kind of lean meats, chicken, or even whey protein powder or something. But to go onto junk food, after you talk about nutrition, doesn't make sense to me. So that's why I say it seems dishonest - and more like cravings, rather than seeking genuine healthy, satisfying alternatives.

     

    Also, giving in to cravings doesn't necessarily mean coming off veganism, there are all kinds of junk you can eat as a vegan if you want comfort food. I can't get my head around calling it austere / ascetic When I first became vegan, I did have some non-vegan slip ups along the way. These days I don't, but I do have slip ups with eating vegan junk food. I mean, there's just everything available, from ice cream, to chocolate, to burgers and candy... I have to work hard to avoid that temptation, I limit myself within veganism to watch my weight. I don't feel like veganism is the restriction - I could be eating all kinds of things - rather healthy eating is my restriction, which would be the same, vegan or not.

     

    But what might work better for you is doing veganism one day out of the week to begin with, it might be less pressure mentally. Then build up doing two days, three etc.

  5. I looked up the protein percentage at Calorie Counthttp://caloriecount.about.com/calories-spinach-i11457 Their percentage of protein is more like 13.5%. I've always been confused by these numbers. When the chart says spinach has 49%, how is that determined? In my mind that would say, essentially, half of a spinach leaf contains protein but I don't believe that to be the case, unless you are Popeye.

     

    How much spinach would I need to eat to get the same protein contained in a single egg? That would help answer this question.

     

    Thanks,

    Burt

     

    It isn't that it is X% protein, it is that X% of the total calories are from protein. These foods are mainly going to be water, which has no calories. What's left will provide calories, which will be from carbs, fat and protein. The total calories are very low, per weight. But of those calories, there is very low amount from fat, high from protein and very high from carbs. To say 'calories from' means that if you have 100 calories of a food, and say 20% come from protein, the that is 20 calories from protein. Since each gram of protein has 4 calories, that would mean it has 5g of protein per 100 calories. I don't understand the disagreement of protein quantities in food either, it is confusing. I generally see around 30% for spinach.

  6. Aspirant, we're all here to support you and make the transition easier. But i think you have to be honest with yourself. On the one hand you said you find it hard to get 'real' food which is filling and nutritonal, stating that falafel and sandwiches are no good. Then you go on to say you're choosing to eat pizza,, cake and chocolate. So be honest, it's nothing to do with anything besides cravings and difficulty cutting out foods you like the taste of - which is a totally different issue to the one you raised - but nothing to be ashamed of. Lots of people struggle to drop the things they love which give them comfort, and i'm sure there will be lots of suggestions on what can be done to help, or even vegan comfort food alternatives. But i think it's important to focus on the truth, otherwise it can't be addressed. Veganism isn't the problem in itself and is not an ascetic lifestyle. You can find vegans of all shapes and sizes, just like any other food program, there are so many options on a vegan diet.

  7. Eating that much fruit, your energy should be through the roof. We don't use protein as energy really, more to repair, so i don't see how you'd feel more energy eating more protein. But if you are trying to build muscle, yes you will need more than 40g per day

  8. It might be something you have to try once to see if you like it. Speaking from experience, having short hair is much easier than having long hair, more practical. However, I've shaved my head 3 times in my life, and each time it didn't feel right. I looked in the mirror and felt like it just wasn't me. Last time was the final time, because it was immediate, I straight away regretted it. But, you won't know until you've done it. I know other people who go back and forth, or who have cut their hair and never gone back. But the number one thing has to be how you feel about it, don't do it because a handful of women on here say so.

  9. You will most likely be constipated due to something you're already eating. You should rectify that, rather than continue to eat in a way that makes you ill, and supplement it with something... Get to the root cause. If you have a medical condition, getting constipation literally regardless of what you eat, i'd see a doctor.

     

    Never heard of spontaneous breast enlargement from flax. Did they shrink after you stopped taking it?

  10. I'd recommend looking at the percentage of calories from protein, rather than amount of protein per 100g. The limit to how much food you eat in a day is their combined calories, not combined weight. So, considering that calories are the limit, you will want to know what food has the highest protein available, in the lowest calories. That way, you will be getting maximum protein in relation to your calorie limit. A food can be light in relation to its protein, but its total calories could be high, and so that food might not be as good as it seems.

  11. My advice is to look at foods in combinations, rather than looking at a single food to give you 1 nutrient. Foods are going to give you more than one nutrient, and you can balance them together in a meal plan, to give you what you want. No matter what the food source is, it's going to have carbs, fat and protein in it. You won't find something which is super high in protein, and then have trace fat and trace carbs, apart from processed foods like protein powders. So if you're not prepared to have them, then you need to look at food in terms of multiple nutrients.

     

    I'd also say that carbs in themselves are not something to be too worried about. You need carbs to be able to do anything, and so long as you're active they shouldn't hold you back, especially when they are in the form of fruit and vegetables. Obviously, you need to watch out for processed sugar, and grains.

  12. If I am going to make a day of it, I can do 150. But the sets go down over the course of the day, can't keep up with max sets... so I might start with 10, then do as many as I can like that, then 9, 8 etc. Chin-ups are easier, could start with 15 and work down with those, but either way, same sort of thing.

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