Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi there **

 

Yep, the place looks nice for training

I hope you`ll enjoy MT... if not, then dont be scared to change the style. You know, most fighters did a lot of styles until they found out, what they are up to. I think the only thing you can do is try and find out.

But as said some month ago (;)) you have to know your goals... and as you said it is for self defense, full-contact is the best choice. It is as close as you can get to a real situation. You can be a pro at any techniques, but it can be worthless if you encounter the first punch in your face... you will be stunned and perhaps too afraid to react.

 

And fudgam.... you know, I wouldnt call all those traditional styles "bullshit"... those styles are thousands of years old and are way more than simple techniques. Those were normally invented by the more poorly equipped population like peasants, to defend against armys which had weapons and armor. So those techniques mostly concentrated on joints cause those could not be protected by armor.

Today the attitude is way different to those times we can hardly think of.

I dont think a college boy of today can come up with the same will and engagement as those warriors of the old age. It is not necessary and besides we are way too sophisticated to believe in such things as inner focus or something called "Chi", arent we?

I would simply say, those techniques are hard to teach to our youth of today... It takes too much time, and all of us want to be Champions tomorrow, if possible without training at all.

 

greets

danny

Link to post
Share on other sites
And fudgam.... you know, I wouldnt call all those traditional styles "bullshit"... I would simply say, those techniques are hard to teach to our youth of today... It takes too much time, and all of us want to be Champions tomorrow, if possible without training at all.

 

greets

danny

Danny, I wouldn't call those traditional styles bullshit either, however I think the that traditional training methods are not as effective as "live" training.

 

Yes, traditional MA take more time to master than MA that emphasize more live training like Judo or Muay Thai, but explain to the street thug who is about to kick your ass that you need a few more years of practice in order to defend yourself.

 

Forms/Kata consist of the same thing. Practicing the same choreographed (mispelled) combination of techniques against air. Striking, blocking and grappling in a street fight is not choreographed. Every person you encounter in a street situation is not going to attack you in the same pattern every time. I think that shadowkickboxing, making contact with thai pads or a heavy bag, sparring with a training partner and learning how to strike and block spontaneous as far as not knowing what your training partner is going to come at you with improves your reflexes, reaction time, and striking power. If someone trains in a grappling MA with little time practicing resistance "live" training how are they being prepared for a street situation if they have rarely practiced grappling techniques with a training partner giving them resistance?

 

As far as your champions of tommorow comment, I agree that sport has become to much of an influence in martial arts but for the obvious reasons marketing and money.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi veganmomma ^^

 

As I said, I too think that full-contact MAs such as MT or boxing are the number one choice for self defense.

No one ever said, that a Kata is a form for self defense... a Kata is a way to master the movements and the correct performance(?.. sorry, Im not too sure with english words sometimes :P)

It would be the same thing to tell a boxer that his/her heavy bag training is useless because the bag will never hit back...

 

 

 

greets

danny

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, it's too bad you have to wait...

 

I wish they had something down in Central illinois but the closest jim is 50 minutes away and i have no car. Gotta wait till when i'm off of college. I get off in the middle of may and go back in late augst so i'll have plenty of time to train. I might even bring a bag along to school. I already have a great weightroom there.

 

Grappling can still be very effective for improving relflexes. Lots of throws(joint or body) are done by catching an opponents punch or kick. I know my friend who has been doing aikido for 8 years can grab any punch coming at him. All of my friends have tried to hit him. Granted none of us have any MA training at all. He did agree that elbows and knees would be hard to counter with aikido.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with traditional martial arts is that they are grounded in tradition and not in competiion or combat effectiveness.

 

Kickboxing is an evolving sport. MMA is an evolving sport. Wrestling (all of them) is an evolving sport.

 

Karate does not. Tae Kwon Do does not. Kung Fu does not. They are grounded in tradition with competition put on the side lines.... except for point fighting..... Sure, some traditional striking MAs include some grappling.... but we generally know how horrible that is.

 

 

Theres a reason you need to be a black belt in traditional martial arts in order to royally whip some ass. And theres a reason that mere amateur boxers/kickboxers are dangerous people. Its not because techniques are more advanced/complicated in those traditional MAs, its because of training methods.

Link to post
Share on other sites

fudgam:

 

We both agree about the necessity for "live" training, however competition and sport don't equal effective street combat. In MMA many matches end up on the ground for long periods of time and if you are on the ground that long in a street fight you will get kicked in the head if not by your attacker then by one of their friends.

 

Other than that I think we are both of the new school of street combat.

 

Peace

Link to post
Share on other sites

In MMA many matches end up on the ground for long periods of time and if you are on the ground that long in a street fight you will get kicked in the head if not by your attacker then by one of their friends.

 

Yeah I agree with this. You definitely do not want to fight on the street when there are hostile bystanders or even just random drunks that might thrown in a kick or two. When I trained Krav Maga I was always taught to get up (and away) as soon as possible. To be effective on the streets (defensewise) my school recommends Muay Thai plus a single mma training session a week, just for a some basic grappling/takedown knowledge.

Link to post
Share on other sites
My goals are self defense and getting into awesome shape.

Muay Thai it is for me, possibly with some BJJ hopefully.

If your goals are self-defense and getting into shape than MT and BJJ are excellent choices. I trained in MT for 6 months and then I supplemented my MT training with BJJ for 2 months before I injured my knee. I was in the best shape of my life at the age of 35 yo. I was going to MT class 3 days a week and BJJ class another 3 days a week. I was sore and beat up as hell from being kicked, punched, choked, and thrown 6 days a week. Many schools that teach one also teach the other MA. I would shop around for BJJ schools because schools affliated with the Gracies can be pricey. I would ask around on some online MA forums or ask people in your area. You may be able to find a less expensive "gem" that is not affiliated with any association.

 

I used to train at this school. The owner may know of some none affiliated schools/instructors in your area. I can't gaurantee he might know of any but it is worth a try. http://www.philadelphiajiujitsu.com/index.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a Gracie gym in chicago. This one is still pretty pricey. It's about 70 bucks for one lesson per week for BJJ. I'll be interning all summer probably so i'm not going to have any income. Granted, this internship will help with money later on in life(and happiness, mostly happiness).

 

I'm really excited for summer and wish that i had a Muay Thai gym in my college town so i could get started.

Link to post
Share on other sites
If Krav Maga didn't support the Israeli army, i would take it.

 

I used to think that I could keep the politics out of the sport but I seriously had to sign a contract where I had to confirm that I had no bad intentions towards either Israel or my own government... I felt this was ridiculous so I quit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
There is a Gracie gym in chicago. This one is still pretty pricey. It's about 70 bucks for one lesson per week for BJJ. I'll be interning all summer probably so i'm not going to have any income. Granted, this internship will help with money later on in life(and happiness, mostly happiness).

 

I'm really excited for summer and wish that i had a Muay Thai gym in my college town so i could get started.

 

 

"gracie" schools always cost more. I would look for alternatives. A lot of the time gracie instructors hold back on their students as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
"gracie" schools always cost more. I would look for alternatives. A lot of the time gracie instructors hold back on their students as well.

What do you mean by hold back on their students? I have heard that "gracie" schools will only teach a few new techniques ever so often to keep students coming back and paying fees. Not that "gracie" schools are much different than any other business.

Link to post
Share on other sites
"gracie" schools always cost more. I would look for alternatives. A lot of the time gracie instructors hold back on their students as well.

What do you mean by hold back on their students? I have heard that "gracie" schools will only teach a few new techniques ever so often to keep students coming back and paying fees. Not that "gracie" schools are much different than any other business.

 

 

lets just say they like to keep things in the "family".

Link to post
Share on other sites
lets just say they like to keep things in the "family".

I have heard that as well. A BJJ instructor I know said he noticed members of the "family" using techniques in competition that were not taught to their students in their schools until years later.

Link to post
Share on other sites
lets just say they like to keep things in the "family".

I have heard that as well. A BJJ instructor I know said he noticed members of the "family" using techniques in competition that were not taught to their students in their schools until years later.

 

 

that is 100% true.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...